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Kurzweil = Curzewheel?
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Antimon



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 3:11 am    Post subject: Kurzweil = Curzewheel? Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I have a very important question that has been bothering me for some time.

I have never spoken to anyone about Kurzweil synths, or Ray Kurzweil's theories, it's all been in forums or chat rooms or reading stuff on the internet. As I understand it, Mr Kurzweil was born and raised in the USA. So the question is: how do I pronounce his name?

In my mind, it has always been spoken like a german person would: (something like "Koortsvile" in english-speak). But since the guy isn't from Germany (austrian parents according to wikipedia), maybe it should be spoken like your average american person who doesn't care about the german use of e.g. the letters Z or W (which I am assuming is the general case without judging or complaining).

So what do you people say? It would be interesting to hear opinions on this from people inside or outside the US, with english as first language or not. This may indeed be vital to the survival of the human race!

scratch

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XCenter



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Ask Wikipedia:
Raymond "Ray" Kurzweil (/ˈkɜrzwaɪl/ KURZ-wyl; born February 12, 1948)

Its spoken the "german" way.

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Oskar



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Should we use the German "r" as well? And a very "thin" "l"?
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Antimon



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

XCenter wrote:
Ask Wikipedia:
Raymond "Ray" Kurzweil (/ˈkɜrzwaɪl/ KURZ-wyl; born February 12, 1948)

Its spoken the "german" way.


Actually I interpret those phonetics as the american way...

But that's just wikipedia's opinion of the virtual average person - I want your opinion, learned e-m folks. I want hot debate! I want blood! Twisted Evil

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Antimon



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Oskar wrote:
Should we use the German "r" as well?


And should it in that case be the Austrian/Osloite one, rolling off the tip of the tongue, or the Hochdeutsch/Tröndelag one, lodged in the back of the throat?

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XCenter



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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Oskar wrote:
Should we use the German "r" as well? And a very "thin" "l"?


Nah, I think we can live with a washy English "r", like "Kurtz": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNRBajLM8_4

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Oskar



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Antimon wrote:
Oskar wrote:
Should we use the German "r" as well?


And should it in that case be the Austrian/Osloite one, rolling off the tip of the tongue, or the Hochdeutsch/Tröndelag one, lodged in the back of the throat?


Us Trøndelag Noggies have more of a roll/flap. You're possibly thinking of Bergen, where you still can hear the Hanseatic past in their "clear-the-throat" r's - a bit like people from Skåne or Danes.

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XCenter



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Posted Image, might have been reduced in size. Click Image to view fullscreen.
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Antimon



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 1:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Oskar wrote:
Antimon wrote:
Oskar wrote:
Should we use the German "r" as well?


And should it in that case be the Austrian/Osloite one, rolling off the tip of the tongue, or the Hochdeutsch/Tröndelag one, lodged in the back of the throat?


Us Trøndelag Noggies have more of a roll/flap. You're possibly thinking of Bergen, where you still can hear the Hanseatic past in their "clear-the-throat" r's - a bit like people from Skåne or Danes.


I apologise for sloppily spreading lies about norwegian dialects. At least now I know where the people I've met with the funny dialects are from. There seem to be quite a few of them!

Anyway, the science of pronouncing the letter 'r' is not to be taken lightly!

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Antimon



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Back on topic: Oskar, how would you pronounce Ray's surname if woken in the middle of the night by a stranger of unknown nationality?

(hoping for some input from people from countries that have acronymn names that start with a U, or are loosely connected with such countries)

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Oskar



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I'd pronounce it like Allan Ewall in his interpretation of Emil's dad. KURZWEEEEEEEEEEEEEIIIIIIL!!!!
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Oskar



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11zpV3p3MkQ
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Antimon



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Very Happy
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Acoustic Interloper



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2012 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I live in so-called Pennsylvania Dutch Country (Dutch being the misunderstood Deutsch of local 2nd- and 3rd-generation English in the 1700's as applied to Germain immigrants). The local Old Order Mennonites and Amish speak a dialect of German as their primary language. They regard everyone outside their religion and culture as "English." I see the horse & buggies of the former on my way to work and often driving past my house daily. African-Americans, Asian-Americans, etc. are all among "the English" to them.
XCenter wrote:
Oskar wrote:
Should we use the German "r" as well? And a very "thin" "l"?


Nah, I think we can live with a washy English "r", like "Kurtz": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNRBajLM8_4

That sounds about right for local pronounciation. There are plenty of Kurtz as in
K ER TZ
families around here. (Or should I say, UH ROND HERE?)
Weil would sound like WILE.
Oskar wrote:
I'd pronounce it like Allan Ewall in his interpretation of Emil's dad. KURZWEEEEEEEEEEEEEIIIIIIL!!!!

Smile

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klangumsetzer



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2012 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

not an answer to stefan's question but the company name 'kurzweil' on my digital piano was often met with laughter because kurzweil (short while) in german means 'entertaining/for amusement' in contrast to langeweile (long while) 'boredom'.

hm, had kurt weill played kurzweil? Wink

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