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How do YOU write tracks?
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Afro88



Joined: Jun 20, 2004
Posts: 701
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 6:33 am    Post subject: How do YOU write tracks? Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I write mainly rhythm orientated stuff an have recently been using a new method of writing music that is all about having as much good audio/patches immediately available. I'd be interested to hear how other people write their music, especially to gain an insight into how other genres of electronic music are composed...

I'll go first Very Happy

I start off with a template. In this I've got my software sampler set up with all my favourite drum sounds organised into kicks, snares, closed hats, bongos, toms etc., my G2 with 4 patches that work well together (usually bass, synth, melodic synth [another synth/marimba/vibraphone etc.], pad) and all the appropriate midi tracks and delay/reverb sends set up, ready to rok.

Then I chop up a few funk drum loops sampled from records (unfortunately I'm not cool enough to own any of these records, but came accross an 800 meg stash of them at the beginning of the year which has since been taken down Sad). These are chopped up into the appropriate kick and snare hits, leaving the hats etc that follow intact. I like to layer these with my own drum patterns to create a nice groove...

Then I fill my mpc with 1 shot 1 tuning samples from my evolver and G2, 1 on each pad. I spend about 30 mins just stuffing around with patches, tweaking and sampling anything that sounds nice into the mpc. I've never gotten into sampling like this, but when you get 100 or so great personalised sounds sitting right there, a finger tap away, it really gets the creative juices flowing. It's like having 100 synths all on different programs right in front of you.

Then I just go nuts and piece it all together into as many 1/2/4/8 bar loops as possible. Even if the loops don't relate to each other, it doesn't matter, I just keep working on each on until it's full, or until I can't think of anything to put in. Then copy over what I like about it and start again. I find that by the 3rd or 4th distinct loop you really start getting a feel for the patches/samples you've chosen and you start doing things you wouldn't have dreamt of with the sounds you chose.

Once there are about 4 or 5 loops that work nicely following each other (could be the next day, could be after a week of work)it's just a case of piecing it together and filling the gaps, then fine tuning, mixing etc. I find it best to do this the next day with fresh ears.

The above method has been working out really great for me. I'm not saying that what I've been writing is great (that's for other people to decide), but I've been having so much fun and in my opinion I've been writing some of my best work. The main thing is having all those sounds already there, waiting for you to start putting them together. All of the "how should I cut this loop up?" or "I need to program a bass patch" or even worse "I need an fx sound to go here" is already done. You don't get stuck thinking "I need something to go here", you get stuck when there's no longer any space to put anything else in. Then you just move onto the next loop! Great fun Very Happy

So what works for you? How do you write your music?
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Mohoyoho



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I'm an ambient musician. If I am writing solo I create a patch on a featured synth that I feel I can go somewhere with. Then I sit down and noodle around until I find a theme. Usually I lay down the chord progression followed by the theme. However, sometimes I'll start with the theme and then lay down the chords. I record on Sonar 4 PE. After I finish a foundation track I then start layering counterpoints and fills. If the track is going to have percussion I will start with that, and build up several layers. Usually I don't like my percussion to sound like conventional instruments. Often I will manually play the percussion track, because I don't have the patience to program drum machines. Many times my percussion tracks aren't machine-perfect in time, but I think that gives them a sort of organic feel.

The composition usually takes weeks or months to finish. I'll work several hours one day, and maybe 15 or 20 minutes another. I constantly tweek, edit, and rework tracks. Sometimes I'll take another composition and rob parts from it to enhance another.

Most of my comps have several themes within it. I think of the piece as a journey, and once I have made my point musically, I move on.

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jkn



Joined: Mar 14, 2004
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I have a few patterns that I've fallen into over the last 25 years (and have to break out of now and then - though these work for me it's always nice to break you're own 'rules')...

+ Sit at the piano and play... Some of my electronic stuff starts on the piano - though admittedly - most of my piano noodling ends up staying on the piano and I rarely (almost never) let anyone hear that unless you're sitting in my living room... Smile In any case - I'll hear an idea and start playing around with it eventually building it up into something. Sometimes I'll take those idea into the studio, sometimes I'll bring a couple of mics out and record. Someday I'll actually record a piano based album - I've thought about it for years.

+ Drum patterns first... If I'm writing a track with drums - they tend to be the foundation. I usually program a few very simple patterns - and then continue to add parts to those patterns. Lately I've fallen into liking Fruity/FL Studio (though my version is still Fruity...). Once I get all the pieces to that pattern where I want them - I'll drop the volume of most of the parts - hit record in Vegas - record the pattern 'live'. I'm usually routing out to hardware effects - and I have a tendency to love the sound of controlled feedback used in very small amounts. As I'm playing and changing effects - I'll bring in different parts and pull others out, change panning, change filter cutoffs, etc... anything to make the track sound how I want it. Beyond that - I'll record synth tracks on top of the drums - recording usually live track by track in long takes. I like the 'liveness' that little quirks in timing and mistakes add to a track.

+ Soundscape type stuff... Sometimes I'll find a sound that I really like and I'll hit record and shape that sound for a good 10-20 minutes. I'll start layering... usually these end up as beatless pieces - although sometimes drums will find their way in. I'll toss field recording type stuff into this category.

+ Planned out in my head... something will hit me in the middle of the night or while at work - and I'll write things down in a sort of shorthand that makes sense to me, but definitely looks like chicken scratches... I'll sketch out multiple parts, rhythms, etc... and translate that to music later on. What I jotted down usually leads to other things - but the spark is what matters.

+ Jamming with others... don't do this as much as I used to - but in my band situations (normally very non-electronic - I play bass in bands typically) - I'm usually not the initial songwriter - someone else comes in with the lyrics and basic ideas and I tended to spark many the changes, breaks, harmonies - many of the inside bits that ultimately make a song a group project rather than someone elses song. That's the greatest thing about a band that works together - someone can have an idea - and a couple of other people can take it to completely new places. In the last few years I've jammed more in an ambient/electronic context with me still on bass (but heavily effected...) and having a ball. Too bad my friends live 3-5 hours away... The give and take of live jamming is so amazing... anyway...

So anyway - that's more or less my approach to writing. I've also written everything out formally (piano pieces back in school for competitions) - but I don't enjoy that much - I'd rather record.

A song of mine can be recorded almost to completion in a day (at least the creative side of it - the mixing/mastering is another story) - or it can take 12 months to take shape. I tend to record a bunch - and toss it onto a cdr for months at a time and then come back to a few tracks when they fit a certain project. The albums I've been a part of - whether solo, collaboration, or just donating a track to a compilation - they've all tended to take 12-24 months. 18 seems about typical. I'm in no rush to release - and if things sit for a while I have a better perspective on whether the track holds up to my ears before I let others hear it. On the other hand - I have a close circle of friends that hear my early versions as I record them. Smile
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Afro88



Joined: Jun 20, 2004
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wow, thanks for the replies guys Very Happy Very interesting...

jkn wrote:
I've also written everything out formally (piano pieces back in school for competitions) - but I don't enjoy that much - I'd rather record.


I did this too (although more for assignments than competitions), and like you I didn't enjoy it much Laughing I much prefer hearing what I've already done while I record new stuff over the top.
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gravehill



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2005 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

For me, I usually (but not always) start with a very general idea of what I want to accomplish or which direction a piece should be. Something as vague as "lots of orchestral percussion" or just a general feeling.

First I load a patch that I can use as a starting point. Most often this is some kind of a melodic sound. Then I just start to improvise. If I don't get the whole song structure at first try, I usually record several shorter phrases and arrange and build around those.

I don't usually change any sounds afterwards. Modulating and effecting them, yes, but since different instrument patches tend to behave differently, I feel that changing the sound often makes it sound like something I didn't intend when I played the part.

After the first melodic noodlings, I arrange the song as far as to have a basic structure to it. Then I start from the beginning and see what the intro would need to make it interesting. Usually I only proceed to next part after previous part is compositionally ready. I find that this chronological approach works the best for me. I know that many professional composers consider it a grave mistake but then again, it probably only means that it's the wrong approach for them.

I have studied counterpoint a bit but basically just enough to know it's rules. I do break those rules a lot. After the main melodic line I'll usually add a second one, with a different sound and in different register but usually also improvised. After that I utilize some contrapuntal rules to harmonize it and "fill the gaps".

Oddly, bass and percussion lines are often the last ones I make for a song. An exception would be if I need those for improvising the lines but usually I put much more emphasis on melody and harmony than rhythm. That's probably why I can't stand techno, either Very Happy

Usually it takes me one evening to finish the piece and to make a raw mix. Usually I then mix it again the next day with fresh ears. then the song just waits until the moment when I need songs for a project and get then probably mixed again just to make the different songs fit better together.

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Mot Juste



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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2005 4:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

a lot of the times for me the process goes like this:

i find a bunch of sounds that i like which i think go together, then i make my first four bars on one sound, and then write complimentary things with the other sounds, and from that point on i pretty much compose the whole song sequentially writing the seperate parts at the same time. the key point is that i never write out one part entirely and then add more elements. each element affects the develpoment of each other element.

of course this just in general.

perhaps this is what was referred to as "chronological approach". i'm interested to know why professional composers consider this a grave mistake.
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mosc
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2005 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I started this method in 1968 and have hardly changed in all these years. The method was the result of access to the new Moog Modular and a new Moog Viking 4 track tape recorder.
  • Patch experimentally on the the synth until I have a nice interesting flexible patch.

  • Record a rehearsed improvisation with this patch for as long as seems appropriate.

  • Listen carefully and rerecord if not satisfied.

  • Do the same thing again sometimes with the same patch, sometimes with a new one, but record the new track while listening to the old one.

  • Repeat.

  • Mix down to two track stereo.



So this is basically improvising with yourself. You can explore all of the compositional forms to your hearts delight this way. I never have enjoyed working with emulations of percussion, bass, or other conventional pop music elements. I just let it fly trying to avoid anything that sounds conventional.

Lately, I've really enjoyed live improvisation with other electronic musicians. Also, with the new G2 having four slots and such a great interface, I can play a lot of music in real time by myself. In fact, I'm trying to completely stop using the multi-track paradigm and do everything in real time.

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rbedgar



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2005 1:48 pm    Post subject: Track "writing"
Subject description: From early Moog...
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I developed a similar approach from working with a big Moog installation at Syracuse U in the early to mid 1970s. Develop a patch through a germ of an idea, playing and modifying; record a track; create a library of tracks in a similar fashion, then edit and mix to taste by bouncing between tape decks and cutting and splicing.

I use this approach from time to time still, now using a combination of PAIA, Roland and Metasonix synths and modules, and doing editing and mixing on the computer.

As I've mentioned in another post, I've also moved to live performance, maybe a reaction to the old days with razor blades and tape? The most relevant approach I've found is to build a hardware and software system that allows me to create and modify a wide variety of sounds live, sampling them in loops of maybe 15 seconds to a minute, and then operate on the loops as they play back. I've never been happy with playing over prerecorded music (mine or anyone else's), nor with the museum-like quality of listening to an all-recorded piece in an auditorium. The looping (while retaining control over variety) seems to mediate that for me.
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Scott013



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 03, 2006 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I haven't yet laid down a method of composition (which is probably why most of my songs haven't gotten finished yet.)

I usually just fool around with some ambient synth patches, string samples or my guitar. I find something I really like, I find something similar to overlap with it, then I try to figure out a nice beat to go with it... then I usually stumble on the next step of the song which is pretty similar, and then I get stuck, not knowing where to go next. I wish I knew more about key changes.
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Doobah



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 2:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Here's a good method for those who aren't too confident with melody/hook construction - in my opinion one of the hardest aspects of writing good music. There's two options, to start from scratch, or to start inspired by another piece of music.

I assigned a musical note to each letter of the alphabet - A=A B=A* C=B D=C*, though you can do it anyway you want to, stciking to certain scales or whatever tickles your fancy. The write a name or a sentence or a title, etc, convert it to a musical notation, and write away. I found that before i did this, i was not too confident with my scales and melody construction in a writing sense, though i practiced as a classical cellist, so understood basic music theory already. This gave me freedom to roam around scales and key changes with confidence, and a number of days later, I had discarded the codes and conversions and composed based on what sounded good.

Another good method, which is perhaps more straight forward than the above, is to take a sample (I use classical or vocal samples to do this - Bach, Shostakovic, as they don't contain confusing elements, such as drums) Then loop a few bars phrase and either compose an accompanyment, or use the sample as accompanyment, and compose over the top. Then take the sample away and you're left with something interesting to play about with.

I tend to work alot with loops, making basic constructions of all the parts i wish to use, getting the sounds right, n a 4bar context for example, and then, when inspiration takes me, i meditate on it and jam out, or re-write the loops and parts incorporating key changes, tempo changes, chorus verse, miixdowns etc until i have a finished article.

I think everybody must have a different style of composition, I find a lot of spiritual freedom in writing music with loops on computers.
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Uncle Krunkus
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 5:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I'm not an amazing musician, though I do have a thing for melody, so the way I do most tracks now is like this: -
I run a basic metronome beat in Cakewalk and plug in a microphone. When I've thought about the mood a bit, I just start singing la, la, la, di, da, da,.... Humming also works really well. I don't try to fix anything, I just leave it in record for up to 4-5mins. It leaves me with a chunk of free associated melodies which I then go about cutting and pasteing, and I begin to transcribe these into the actual synth voices I want to use. I get to a point where the transcription has overtaken the original "vocal jamming" and I then mute it, or delete it. You have to be prepared to throw away alot of the jam, and just tease out of it the bits that inspire you. There's usually some extra work to do after the jam is ditched, but by that time I'm well and truly on the way.

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revken



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I used to start by messing around with sounds until it gave me inspiration for the rest - it seemed to work OK - I think I'd be frustrated trying to recreate the tune I composed in my head (although that's fun too).

Now I use something completely different - it's evolutionary and it starts off from random loops using quite a large palette of sounds and synths - all I have to do is listen and rate it (good/ok/bad) and after a few hours I have music - I wrote the software from scratch and it's not available yet, but I did put an interactive version on the web - so you can try it too - see my signature.

I'll plug it here properly one day - just found this forum and wanted to say hi first...

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Blue Hell
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Welcome revken

The avatae is familliar, we've had one like that here before. Who is it ?

Looks like nice software, does it listen or do you permute parameter lists ?

I'l have a look at the site anyway :-)

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revken



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2006 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Blue Hell wrote:
Welcome revken

The avatae is familliar, we've had one like that here before. Who is it ?

Looks like nice software, does it listen or do you permute parameter lists ?

I'l have a look at the site anyway Smile


Hi Jan,

thanks for the warm welcome.

my avatar? it's the one true J.R. "Bob" Dobbs... (Church of the Subgenius - see Wikipedia)

my program - I suppose (in your terminology) it fiddles around with the parameters (note pitch, position, effects, etc, etc) and the user has to listen and provide feedback (good/ok/bad).

hope you like it - i'll start a new thread tomorrow for discussion so we don't pollute this one - or someone else can.

cheers!

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destroyifyer



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 9:19 am    Post subject: uh
Subject description: uh
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You can make cool sounding beats using my 'Lazy and bored' technological developments.

these are all computer techs...unless you got a bad-ass digi sampler or keyboard from outer space or something like that.

Mission I: Make a drum track, then copy and mod the drum track until it doesn't sound anything like drums (keep it clean) and then run both tracks through a channel mixer. With a little elbow grease, it sounds cool.

Mission II: Make a main (drums ect) track, make synth, and load them both (or more) up in Sound Recorder on a computer (in separate windows) with a third S.R. window that will be the master track. You can bounce around the synth track at will, while playing main track and recording on the master track simotaniously, and make some cool sounding music (e.x. you can hit the mouse really fast and make a 'ghetto sampler' that often works out good). This takes a little practice with the master track volume...

but, good luck

Special K
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gsilbers



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 28, 2006 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

working with templates definitly has helped me a lot. in logic i open a "dance" template where i have samplers and softsynth geared to that genre.
for film score/ambient style i use the same. but have synths like atmosphere.

i loop 8 bars with some beat going on. sometime i use LIVE as a rewiere slave and start going through tons of loops just for reference.
then i do the bass or chord progresion. i dont have good luck writing the melody 1st cause it soundds kinda off
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franzrosati



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 02, 2006 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

i'm not a composer, but i like a lot real time composition through algos and generative ways. I'm in a starting point at all.

My way, is to generate some lyers or sort of templates of music "forms", save it in real time, and interpolate them with the actual musical-form through system like the pattrstorage external of MaxMSP. So half human / half algorithmical Very Happy

I also like a lot the Metasurface system in Audiomulch, or the int.lib for MaxMSP, where you can freely "navigate" through templates!

I Also like to do Filed Recording and then process the audio in some weird ways.

cheers!

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renevanderwouden



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I also start with a template in Logic. Then I start to work out some ideas. Most of the time it goes from there on. I don't know why, it just happen.

Wanna hear some results? Go to: http://www.renevanderwouden.net/project/project.htm

Anyway I love to work with my Apple G4 dual 1 Ghz MDD. Great composition tool.

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sculpture



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Roughly, here's what I do:

make rhythms or other rough element in Ableton Live, maybe chop up my own 'loose' playing of drums/noise/sampler/whatever and sometimes program 'beats' or sample records and chop - then burn a load of these ideas to CD

then i do some kinda improv with 1/4" tape loops(found stuff and my own stuff too), cassettes played in walkman, the prepared computer shit on CD, Korg ES1 sampler - mainly for one-shots, circuit bent bits and bobs, cracklebox home made by a friend. secret weapon: deltalabs effectron II (not secret anymore - wildest digital delay ever). So I do all that live, jigsawing it all together - it's pretty chaotic, and fun.

I get too bored and frustrated looking at a monitor screen, I need to move everything into the physical world before it makes sense to me.

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chuck



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2006 3:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

It's like Curly told Billy Crystal in "City Slickers".. The secret to life is 'one thing'. True for music too, as I see it. No matter how complex the presentation may end up being, I try to think of every piece of music I do as telling 'one thing'. That might be the rhythmic feel, or some interesting chord progression, or perhaps just a soundscape of the interaction of a couple of tone colors. It's really the same process for me, decide what is to be presented, get a focus (mentally) on that 'thing' and make all other parts of the music serve that focus.

I find myself getting really irrated by music that has elements that are competing for my attention. And while the point of the music might be the interaction of two elements, personally I don't think it works if they are equal.

Consider the books of John Irving. He has all kinds of sub plots and other stories going on, and he handles that sort of writing masterfully. But.. there is one story that is more important than the others.

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kvnvk



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Mohoyoho wrote:

The composition usually takes weeks or months to finish. I'll work several hours one day, and maybe 15 or 20 minutes another. I constantly tweek, edit, and rework tracks. Sometimes I'll take another composition and rob parts from it to enhance another.


pretty much how I work on my noise pieces. sometimes I have a general idea of how I'd like to begin a track, while other times I just start creating and playing with sounds until I get something interesting. normally I don't have any manner of backing "framework" to build a piece upon, it just takes shape over the course of time I'm working on it. in some ways I tend to think of my material as a "linear jigsaw puzzle", if that makes any sense.
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LOW.Z



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I usually start with drums and work up, unless the idea originates with a specific chord structure or melody. I like to work with the SR-202 drum machine plugin, so I hunt down about 16 sounds to fill it up. Usually 2-3 each of kick and snare type sounds, hi-hat or tambourine sounds, and then maybe some abstract bleepy sounds. I use the piano roll in SONAR and loop maybe 4 measures to get the groove going and establish the tempo. I'll "hear" the rhythm in my head, and it's a matter of getting the pattern I'm building to match up. I build a few diffrent variations of the groove and make loops, then use those to rough out the song.

At this point I'll start working out the bassline and melody, then some chords and textural parts. When a song arrangement starts to emerge, I'll go back and vary the drums a bit, and program some fills. As the track evolves, one part might affect another, they push and pull on each other until things start to sound good. After a certain point it's a very organic process, the trick is to recognize when it's sounding good and not too worked over.
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Himer



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2006 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

LOW.Z wrote:
I usually start with drums and work up, unless the idea originates with a specific chord structure or melody. I like to work with the SR-202 drum machine plugin, so I hunt down about 16 sounds to fill it up. Usually 2-3 each of kick and snare type sounds, hi-hat or tambourine sounds, and then maybe some abstract bleepy sounds. I use the piano roll in SONAR and loop maybe 4 measures to get the groove going and establish the tempo. I'll "hear" the rhythm in my head, and it's a matter of getting the pattern I'm building to match up. I build a few diffrent variations of the groove and make loops, then use those to rough out the song.

At this point I'll start working out the bassline and melody, then some chords and textural parts. When a song arrangement starts to emerge, I'll go back and vary the drums a bit, and program some fills. As the track evolves, one part might affect another, they push and pull on each other until things start to sound good. After a certain point it's a very organic process, the trick is to recognize when it's sounding good and not too worked over.


although i dont begin with drums mostly, that sounds pretty much like the approach that i mostly use. establish a rhythmic and harmonic structure (mostly 8 Bars in the beginning) and then concentrate the whole music piece in these 8 Bars to tear them apart afterwards and rebuild them in a more dramatic structure. also adding some tracks later on, but the beginning is mosly this very concentrated loop that is later "unfolded"...
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Mohoyoho



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

It's been a while since I first posted on this thread. I thought I would share how Michael and I compose a track together:

On our own we work on potential themes or sketches of themes. These might consist of a melody or a rhythm or both. Then we will get together and play the new themes to one another. Usually nothing comes out of it at this point, but occasionally something will click. From there we will hammer it out and tweak it till we feel we have something. Often the themes we create individually don't initially go anywhere. So we'll start jamming to get the juices flowing. It is at this point that our rejected themes might eek their way into the jam and find an appropriate use. We record our rehearsals and jams. Then we critically listen to them. Sometimes we'll find some nice moments, and we will go back and work them out again. Sometimes we'll find stretches that don't go anywhere, and they will be eliminated. Often Michael and I will find two different points that need to be together. So we'll perform it again with the changes. We rehearse with pen and paper nearby so that we can document what we do. Our tracks go through so many patches and different synths, and it is hard to keep track mentally.

Our music is meant to be performed live. We don't usually overtrack. We don't sequence anything other than a step sequenced rhythm part. We both inspire the other's playing, and when we attend events like electro-music 2005 and 2006, we come back inspired. What we pick up at the conferences work their way into our compositions. For example: I am now working on improving my rhythm and arps. Vytear's performance inspired me to attempt new rhythm approaches. We already have a composition in the works that encompasses that. Michael and I have good chemistry working together. We're not afraid to tell the other not do this or that. For example: I thought I had some cool rhythm parts created on a step sequencer. When I played them to Michael he told me they were too conventional. He was right. That's part of being a team.

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Blue Hell
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Mohoyoho wrote:
I thought I had some cool rhythm parts created on a step sequencer. When I played them to Michael he told me they were too conventional. He was right. That's part of being a team.


One of the last things I listened to in my car (before the CD player got stolen) was a recording of the workst the two of you did for the electro-music new year's eve concert. That one had some damned good sequencing going on !

So your process seems to work pretty well Very Happy

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