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Art Schmooze
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elektro80
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 8:43 pm    Post subject: Art Schmooze Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Hey guys. I just decided I want to share some great art I like. I have no idea how you guys like this though.. Anyway.. here goes:

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Contrasting Sounds - by Kandinsky ( 1924 )
Oil on cardboard, 70x49.5cm; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris

More on Kandinsky and abstraction at: http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/kandinsky/sea-battle/



Born in Moscow in 1866, Kandinsky spent his early childhood in Odessa. His parents played the piano and the zither and Kandinsky himself learned the piano and cello at an early age. The influence of music in his paintings cannot be overstated, down to the names of his paintings "Improvisations", "Impressions", and "Compositions."
In 1886, he enrolled at the University of Moscow, chose to study law and economics, and after passing his examinations, lectured at the Moscow Faculty of Law. He enjoyed success not only as a teacher but also wrote extensively on spirituality, a subject that remained of great interest and ultimately exerted substantial influence in his work. In 1895 Kandinsky attended a French Impressionist exhibition where he saw Monet's "Haystacks at Giverny." He stated, " ...it was from the catalog I learned this was a haystack. I was upset I had not recognized it. I also thought the painter had no right to paint in such an imprecise fashion. Dimly I was aware too that the object did not appear in the picture... "
Soon thereafter, at the age of thirty, Kandinsky left Moscow and went to Munich to study life-drawing, sketching and anatomy, regarded then as basic for an artistic education.
Ironically, Kandinsky's work moved in a direction that was of much greater abstraction than that which was pioneered by the Impressionists. It was not long before his talent surpassed the constraints of art school and he began exploring his own ideas of painting - " ...I applied streaks and blobs of colors onto the canvas with a palette knife and I made them sing with all the intensity I could... " Now considered to be the founder of abstract art, his work was exhibited throughout Europe from 1903 onwards, and often caused controversy among the public, the art critics, and his contemporaries.
An active participant in several of the most influential and controversial art movements of the 20th century, among them the Blue Rider which he founded along with Franz Marc and the Bauhaus which also attracted Klee, Geiniger, and Schonberg, Kandinsky continued to further express and define his form of art, both on canvas and in his theoretical writings. His reputation became firmly established in the United States through numerous exhbitions and his work was introduced to Solomon Guggenheim, who became one of his most enthusiastic supporters.
In 1933, Kandinsky left Germany and settled near Paris, in Neuilly. The paintings from these later years were again the subject of controversy. Though out of favor with many of the patriarchs of Paris's artistic community, younger artists admired Kandinsky. His studio was visited regularly by Miro, Arp, Magnelli and Sophie Tauber.
Kandinsky continued painting almost until his death in June, 1944. His unrelenting quest for new forms which carried him to the very extremes of geometric abstraction have provided us with an unparalleled collection of abstract art.










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On White II, 1923
Oil on canvas, 105x98cm
Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Here's one of my paintings.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Art of Noises - a manifest



Luigi Russolo

Dear Balilla Pratella, great Futurist composer,

In Rome, in the Costanzi Theatre, packed to capacity, while I was listening to the orchestral performance of your overwhelming Futurist music, with my Futurist friends, Marinetti, Boccioni, Carrà, Balla, Soffici, Papini and Cavacchioli, a new art came into my mind which only you can create, the Art of Noises, the logical consequence of your marvelous innovations.

Ancient life was all silence. In the nineteenth century, with the invention of the machine, Noise was born. Today, Noise triumphs and reigns supreme over the sensibility of men. For many centuries life went by in silence, or at most in muted tones. The strongest noises which interrupted this silence were not intense or prolonged or varied. If we overlook such exceptional movements as earthquakes, hurricanes, storms, avalanches and waterfalls, nature is silent.

Amidst this dearth of noises, the first sounds that man drew from a pieced reed or streched string were regarded with amazement as new and marvelous things. Primitive races attributed sound to the gods; it was considered sacred and reserved for priests, who used it to enrich the mystery of their rites.

And so was born the concept of sound as a thing in itself, distinct and independent of life, and the result was music, a fantastic world superimposed on the real one, an inviolatable and sacred world. It is easy to understand how such a concept of music resulted inevitable in the hindering of its progress by comparison with the other arts. The Greeks themselves, with their musical theories calculated mathematically by Pythagoras and according to which only a few consonant intervals could be used, limited the field of music considerably, rendering harmony, of which they were unaware, impossible.

The Middle Ages, with the development and modification of the Greek tetrachordal system, with the Gregorian chant and popular songs, enriched the art of music, but continued to consider sound in its development in time, a restricted notion, but one which lasted many centuries, and which still can be found in the Flemish contrapuntalists’ most complicated polyphonies.

The chord did not exist, the development of the various parts was not subornated to the chord that these parts put together could produce; the conception of the parts was horizontal not vertical. The desire, search, and taste for a simultaneous union of different sounds, that is for the chord (complex sound), were gradually made manifest, passing from the consonant perfect chord with a few passing dissonances, to the complicated and persistent dissonances that characterize contemporary music.

At first the art of music sought purity, limpidity and sweetness of sound. Then different sounds were amalgamated, care being taken, however, to caress the ear with gentle harmonies. Today music, as it becomes continually more complicated, strives to amalgamate the most dissonant, strange and harsh sounds. In this way we come ever closer to noise-sound.

This musical evolution is paralleled by the multipication of machines, which collaborate with man on every front. Not only in the roaring atmosphere of major cities, but in the country too, which until yesterday was totally silent, the machine today has created such a variety and rivalry of noises that pure sound, in its exiguity and monotony, no longer arouses any feeling.

To excite and exalt our sensibilities, music developed towards the most complex polyphony and the maximum variety, seeking the most complicated successions of dissonant chords and vaguely preparing the creation of musical noise. This evolution towards “noise sound” was not possible before now. The ear of an eighteenth-century man could never have endured the discordant intensity of certain chords produced by our orchestras (whose members have trebled in number since then). To our ears, on the other hand, they sound pleasant, since our hearing has already been educated by modern life, so teeming with variegated noises. But our ears are not satisfied merely with this, and demand an abundance of acoustic emotions.

On the other hand, musical sound is too limited in its qualitative variety of tones. The most complex orchestras boil down to four or five types of instrument, varying in timber: instruments played by bow or plucking, by blowing into metal or wood, and by percussion. And so modern music goes round in this small circle, struggling in vain to create new ranges of tones.

This limited circle of pure sounds must be broken, and the infinite variety of “noise-sound” conquered.

Besides, everyone will acknowledge that all musical sound carries with it a development of sensations that are already familiar and exhausted, and which predispose the listener to boredom in spite of the efforts of all the innovatory musicians. We Futurists have deeply loved and enjoyed the harmonies of the great masters. For many years Beethoven and Wagner shook our nerves and hearts. Now we are satiated and we find far more enjoyment in the combination of the noises of trams, backfiring motors, carriages and bawling crowds than in rehearsing, for example, the “Eroica” or the “Pastoral”.

We cannot see that enormous apparatus of force that the modern orchestra represents without feeling the most profound and total disillusion at the paltry acoustic results. Do you know of any sight more ridiculous than that of twenty men furiously bent on the redoubling the mewing of a violin? All this will naturally make the music-lovers scream, and will perhaps enliven the sleepy atmosphere of concert halls. Let us now, as Futurists, enter one of these hospitals for anaemic sounds. There: the first bar brings the boredom of familiarity to your ear and anticipates the boredom of the bar to follow. Let us relish, from bar to bar, two or three varieties of genuine boredom, waiting all the while for the extraordinary sensation that never comes.

Meanwhile a repugnant mixture is concocted from monotonous sensations and the idiotic religious emotion of listeners buddhistically drunk with repeating for the nth time their more or less snobbish or second-hand ecstasy.

Away! Let us break out since we cannot much longer restrain our desire to create finally a new musical reality, with a generous distribution of resonant slaps in the face, discarding violins, pianos, double-basses and plainitive organs. Let us break out!

It’s no good objecting that noises are exclusively loud and disagreeable to the ear.

It seems pointless to enumerate all the graceful and delicate noises that afford pleasant sensations.

To convince ourselves of the amazing variety of noises, it is enough to think of the rumble of thunder, the whistle of the wind, the roar of a waterfall, the gurgling of a brook, the rustling of leaves, the clatter of a trotting horse as it draws into the distance, the lurching jolts of a cart on pavings, and of the generous, solemn, white breathing of a nocturnal city; of all the noises made by wild and domestic animals, and of all those that can be made by the mouth of man without resorting to speaking or singing.

Let us cross a great modern capital with our ears more alert than our eyes, and we will get enjoyment from distinguishing the eddying of water, air and gas in metal pipes, the grumbling of noises that breathe and pulse with indisputable animality, the palpitation of valves, the coming and going of pistons, the howl of mechanical saws, the jolting of a tram on its rails, the cracking of whips, the flapping of curtains and flags. We enjoy creating mental orchestrations of the crashing down of metal shop blinds, slamming doors, the hubbub and shuffling of crowds, the variety of din, from stations, railways, iron foundries, spinning wheels, printing works, electric power stations and underground railways.

Nor should the newest noises of modern war be forgotten. Recently, the poet Marinetti, in a letter from the trenches of Adrianopolis, described to me with marvelous free words the orchestra of a great battle:


“every 5 seconds siege cannons gutting space with a chord ZANG-TUMB-TUUMB mutiny of 500 echos smashing scattering it to infinity. In the center of this hateful ZANG-TUMB-TUUMB area 50square kilometers leaping bursts lacerations fists rapid fire batteries. Violence ferocity regularity this deep bass scanning the strange shrill frantic crowds of the battle Fury breathless ears eyes nostrils open! load! fire! what a joy to hear to smell completely taratatata of the machine guns screaming a breathless under the stings slaps traak-traak whips pic-pac-pum-tumb weirdness leaps 200 meters range Far far in back of the orchestra pools muddying huffing goaded oxen wagons pluff-plaff horse action flic flac zing zing shaaack laughing whinnies the tiiinkling jiiingling tramping 3 Bulgarian battalions marchingcroooc-craaac [slowly] Shumi Maritza or Karvavena ZANG-TUMB-TUUUMB toc-toc-toc-toc [fast] crooc-craac [slowly] crys of officers slamming about like brass plates pan here paak thereBUUUM ching chaak [very fast] cha-cha-cha-cha-chaak down there up around high up look out your head beautiful! Flashing flashing flashing flashing flashing flashing footlights of the forts down there behind that smoke Shukri Pasha communicates by phone with 27 forts in Turkish in German Allo! Ibrahim! Rudolf! allo! allo! actors parts echos of prompters scenery of smoke forests applause odor of hay mud dung I no longer feel my frozen feet odor of gunsmoke odor of rot Tympani flutes clarinets everywhere low high birds chirping blessed shadows cheep-cheep-cheep green breezes flocksdon-dan-don-din-baaah Orchestra madmen pommel the performers they terribly beaten playing Great din not erasing clearing up cutting off slighter noises very small scraps of echos in the theater area 300 square kilometers Rivers Maritza Tungia stretched out Rodolpi Mountains rearing heights loges boxes 2000 shrapnels waving arms exploding very white handkerchiefs full of gold srrrr-TUMB-TUMB2000 raised grenades tearing out bursts of very black hair ZANG-srrrr-TUMB-ZANG-TUMB-TUUMB the orchestra of the noises of war swelling under a held note of silence in the high sky round golden balloon that observes the firing...”


We want to attune and regulate this tremendous variety of noises harmonically and rhythmically.

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A painting by Russolo


The full text can be read at:
http://www.unknown.nu/futurism/noises.html
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Great Greg! That would be a modulative abstraction!!!
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

FUTURISM was one of the longest lived and broadest encompassing artistic movements of the 20th century, although it tends to be denied the importance it deserves because of its political associations.


Many of the early Futurists were anarchists, the movement was welcomed by Gramsci and emulated amongst the Bolsheviks, but it was the association of Futurismo with Fascismo that has left it somewhat tainted amongst progressives. This is ironic in that Futurism was the quintessenence of 20th century modernism and paralleled 'the cult of the new' exemplified in Lenin's dictum "socialism + electricity = communism". Although Mussolini's regime utilised modernist traits, it was more at home with the neo-classicism of Novecento.


Although mainly associated with the visual arts, Futurism began in 1909 with the proclamation of a manifesto by the Italian poet, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944). The manifesto not only celebrated the dynamism of the machine age but strongly negated the past: "We will destroy the museums, libraries, academies of every kind..."


The course of Futurism was to be characterised by the issuing of manifestos, and, indeed, it has been suggested that the ideas were better than the art. Marinetti's founding manifesto was followed in 1910 by two manifestos on painting signed by Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carra, Luigi Russolo, Giacomo Balla and Gino Severini. They were not at that time actually working in the style that was to become Futurism, but they spoke of rendering "dynamic sensation".


Further manifestos came thick and fast. Futurist sculpture was outlined by Boccioni in 1912, while in 1914 architecture was addressed by Antonio Sant'Elia whose designs presaged the soaring buildings of the later 20th century.


Stylistically four phases of Futurist art may be discerned: the first stage, heavily influenced by Cubism (Boccioni's 'lines of force'); from 1916, geometric abstracts (Balla); the machine art of the 20s (cf. Russian Constructivism); and the Aeropittura ('aero-painting') of the 1930s.


Besides the visual arts, Futurism was also to manifest itself in literature, the theatre and music, with proclamations eventually reaching clothes fashions, food and drink, and even toys. Luigi Russolo's The Art of Noises 1913 advocated imitating the sounds of modern life. This was to be done through the use of 'Noise Intoners' which imitated industrial sounds and belonged to instrumental families such as exploders, cracklers, buzzers and scrapers.


The hard geometric lines characteristic of Futurism were shared with other contemporary schools, especially Cubism, while all these movements both reflected and influenced 'Art Moderne' (or the 'Jazz Style') now referred to by the 60s coining of 'Art Deco'. The ideology of 20th century geometric art was addressed by T E Hulme.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Boccioni, Umberto (1882-1916). Italian Futurist painter and theorist, and the only sculptor in the movement. In Rome together withSeverini he learnt from Balla the principles of Divisionism, which was then the vogue. In 1910 he signed the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painting and from then until 1914 was the chief exponent of Futurist theory. He advocated a complete break with the past, felt poisoned by the art of 1900, and made it his aim to give life to matter by transposing it in terms of movement, e.g. a horse's movement in a race would be rendered by painting its successive positions simultaneously. A well known painting of this kind is his Elasticity (1912). He knew and was influenced by the Cubists although their aims were different. In his sculpture, often combining in one work such different materials as iron, wood, and glass, he avoided using straight lines in favour of what be called 'lines of force' (Unique forms of continuity in space). He was, conscripted and died in an accident in 1916.


In 1914 Boccioni published a book called Futurist Painting and Non-Culture. He claimed that whereas the Impressionists painted to perpetuate a single moment of vision, Futurism synthesizes in a picture all possible moments. In contrast to the objective outlook of Cubism he claimed that Futurist painting aspires also to express 'states of the soul'. His own 'lines of force' were explained in opposition to the Metaphysical painters and were supposed to embody the 'form force' and the 'colour force' with which an object reacts to its environment. The way in which these concepts were exemplified in the work of the Futurists did not become clear.



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Boccioni - Dynamics of a Footballer, 1913
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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Burial of the Anarchist Galli, 1911 - By Carlo Carra
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2003 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Edward Hopper!

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Nighthawks
1942 (120 Kb); Oil on canvas, 30 x 60 in; The Art Institute of Chicago

He trained under Robert Henri, 1900-06, and between 1906 and 1910 made three trips to Europe, though these had little influence on his style. Hopper exhibited at the Armoury Show in 1913, but from then until 1923 he abandoned painting, earning his living by commercial illustration. Thereafter, however, he gained widespread recognition as a central exponent of American Scene painting, expressing the loneliness, vacuity, and stagnation of town life. Yet Hopper remained always an individualist: `I don't think I ever tried to paint the American scene; I'm trying to paint myself.'
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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...and what about Jackson Pollock's Action Painting Question

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Politics is the entertainment division of the military industrial complex - Frank Zappa
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 4:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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and Gustav Klimt? I saw it live in Wien, Austria Exclamation

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Pollock? Yes, I like all of what I have seen fof his works.

Klimt is special. The best way to see how wild Klimt is, is to actually see his paintiings up close. Reproductions will not do.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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Quote:
Jan or Johannes Vermeer van Delft, b. October 1632, d. December 1675, a Dutch genre painter who lived and worked in Delft, created some of the most exquisite paintings in Western art.
His works are rare. Of the 35 or 36 paintings generally attributed to him, most portray figures in interiors. All his works are admired for the sensitivity with which he rendered effects of light and color and for the poetic quality of his images.

He's the best. I saw this picture and many others by him at the Mauritshuis in The Hague, Netherlands. I would go back there only to see those pictures again. I saw other works by him in Paris and in New York.
I would like to go to Washington D.C. and to St. Petersburg, Russia to see other works by him Exclamation

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I love that Boccioni.
Also Edward Hopper is one of my favorites.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wanna share some Hopper pix? You have any special favorites.

VerMeer is cool! Indeed! Hmm.. reminds me of some other stuff. Where do I have my Louvre catalogue?
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

and what about Vincent?
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Someone says I look like Vincent Van Gogh.
One day I was at the Louvre in Paris, I was sitting waiting for my wife, I was wearing a T-shirt with long sleeves and horizontal white and blue strips. One guy with a videocamera looks at me, points his camera toward me and says: "Van Gogh" filming the scene and leaves Shocked

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

But you still have both of your ears??
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

When I saw the painting "Wheat Field With Crows" (shown above) I was overwhelmed by emotions. Its power was too much to withstand. Never felt that way in front of a painting. I had to move my sight away from it to start breathing again: I was crying. At same time there were people looking at it like you watch a refrigerator in a mall. Startling Exclamation
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

elektro80 wrote:
But you still have both of your ears??

I am not that nutty...............yet Very Happy

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I know the feeling. I once spent 3 days in the Louvre. From opening time until they closed.. for 3 days. You have been there too Carlo? Greg?
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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Seurat, Georges
The Circus
1891
Oil on canvas
73 x 59 1/8 in
Musee d'Orsay, Paris

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

You took that one home?


Musee d'Orsay! Excellent place. All the "modern" stuff is there. That place is wild. Think about doing a concert there in the main hall!!!

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It used to be a railroad station.


The Musée d'Orsay is a national museum which opened to the public in December 1986 in order to show, in all its diversity, the artistic creation of the western world from 1848 to 1914.

The museum's nationally-owned collections originate from three main institutions: the Musée du Louvre, for works by artists born after 1820 or who emerged into the art world with the Second Republic (1848-1852); the Musée du Jeu de Paume, which had been dedicated since 1947 to Impressionism; and finally the Musée National d'Art Moderne, which, when it was installed in the Centre Georges Pompidou in 1976, had only conserved works by artists born after 1870.

The mission of the Musée d'Orsay differs from that of the Musée National d'Art Moderne and its predecessor the former Musée du Luxembourg (dedicated since 1818 to living artists), both museums of passage where works by deceased artists found new destinations. The Musée d'Orsay concentrates on a given period and enlarges the scope of its collections to include areas previously neglected: besides painting, sculpture, graphic and decorative arts, the museum has also established collections of furniture, architecture and photography.

Since 1978, the acquisitions policy has taken these new priorities into account while continuing to develop the traditional domains, for which a new balance between innovative tendencies and official art, between French art and foreign schools, has been sought.

A variety of means of enriching the collections were employed: apart from donations and bequests, for the most part originating in private initiatives but also encouraged by the dynamism of the project, the museum benefitted from special acquisition subsidies, allotted before its opening by the civil commission in charge of its creation. In addition, the museum has conducted a campaign of exchanges and deposits which has brought back to Paris certain important pieces of official production which were famous in their day and which are now indispensable exhibits.

The same acquisitions policy is still in effect today; it is centered on the major works which could complete or enrich the collections, as well as on more modest testimony such as estates from artists' studios.

Last edited by elektro80 on Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:31 am; edited 1 time in total
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seraph
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

the Musee d'Orsay is a blast.
The Italian architect Gae Aulenti did a marvelous job restructuring the old railroad station.
That's a beautiful monument to the human genius.
I am happy to be in the same league Very Happy

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Politics is the entertainment division of the military industrial complex - Frank Zappa
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Aren´t we lucky! Very Happy Very Happy Shocked
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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The course of Futurism was to be characterised by the issuing of manifestos, and, indeed, it has been suggested that the ideas were better than the art. Marinetti's founding manifesto was followed in 1910 by two manifestos on painting signed by Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carra, Luigi Russolo, Giacomo Balla and Gino Severini. They were not at that time actually working in the style that was to become Futurism, but they spoke of rendering "dynamic sensation".

Giacomo Balla named his two daughters Elica (helix) and Luce (light). Not bad Exclamation

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 12, 2003 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Not bad indeed!

Any synthtesist ever named his children after his favourite synth modules?
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