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Interesting Analog Synth Modules
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elektro80
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 2:28 pm    Post subject: Interesting Analog Synth Modules Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

btw. I did add some vendor links in the hardware section..

There are some very amusing links to stuff like analog synth modules etc.
I recommend you check out some of this stuff and if you see modules that does not make much sense, study them more. there are some very amusing designs out there which are very tempting.. Anyway.. the ideas might show up in digital gear some day.. but until then.. drool.. drool..
Howard... I guess much of this can easily coexist with your Moog
Wink

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

There certainly are lots of interesting links. Thanks to you and others for contributing. There are synthesizer manufacturers I have never heard of. There's a lot to look through. Can you point us to a few interesting modules of which you spoke?
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elektro80
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread



http://www.scampers.com/cyndustries/modules_GateComp.cfm

Here is a comparator that can manipulate pulse strings or shift timing sequences to stagger events over time.
A utility module of sorts, with a twist...

The comparator's output goes high when the input voltage is greater than the reference voltage set by the threshold knob. Following that is a eight-stage digital shift-register which samples the output of the comparator at the rate of the clock signal and presents it at the first output. The following seven outputs simply pass what happened on the previous clock pulses down the line. This is incredibly useful as a gate delay, or for example to automatically vary the timing of mutiple events!

Now here comes the twist, the logic levels stored in this shift register are also converted into a varying control voltage by an internal D/A converter and presented at the RM random melody output!

This Random Melody control voltage also has an evil inverted twin, thus the plausable counter-arabesque patterning and timing possibilities are stupendous when combined with a Modcan Sample & Hold 07A module, Pulse Divider 20A, or a Cynthia brand Psycho Shift Register!


---------------------------------------------


The StereOspace
From flea to behemoth at the twist of a knob?

http://www.scampers.com/cyndustries/modules_stereospace.cfm

Sonic Holography is not new, however this design combining a psycho acoustical processor with a modern ultra clean throughput, and voltage control of both presence and of some serious bass enhancement circuitry, has never been available anywhere before!

The StereOspace is the ideal stereo output section for your modular system. Did we mention the convenient headphone pre-amp and adapter jacks built right into the front panel? You'll wonder how you got along without them!

This effect is quite different from reverb or echo as it is not a delay manipulating the size of a virtual performance space such as ordinary controls labeled "cathedral" or "small club". Instead it may very well control the perceived size of the listener themselves!

A pair of adult human eyes are typically about two and a half inches apart. In the visual world of 3D cinematography, the perceived size of say, Niagara Falls can be manipulated to look as big as the ocean or as small as a fishbowl - by varying the interocular spread or distance between two lenses.

If you were ten-thousand feet tall, the interocular space between your eyes might be hundreds of feet apart, while a butterfly's eyes are only a millimeter apart at best... as you can see, this interocular thing has quite large effect on the perceived size your world!

Translating this same phenomenon to the sonic, this unique module could be said to vary the perceived space between the listener's ears! Yes, it's different and something new!

Of course this is handy in so many ways, you might like to reach over and simply give the knobs a tweak now and then to help keep your output dynamically changing and excitingly fresh!

Amazing effects can be had In Surround Sound environments, by voltage controlling one StereoSpace for the front stereo spread, while a second SterOspace manipulates the rear surrounds. Go on, Freak 'em out!


--------------------------------------------------------------


Blacet Dark Star Chaos

Like a one-panel mini synthesizer of it's own, it's incredibly useful as an independent chaotic voice in a system because it features voltage control of it's pulse width, noise clock rate, and oscillator & filter frequencies. The built-in envelope generator is also modified for voltage control, and there is a separate filter output modification as well.

Due to scarcity of parts, these are no longer manufactured by Blacet Research. Occasionally we find one of these, although they are scarcer than dragon's teeth... Best to capture your own Dark Star Chaos Module and send it to us - if it is ever to learn the Modcanian ways...

Last edited by elektro80 on Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:12 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread


http://www.blacet.com

Inspired by the legendary Blacet Digital Pattern Generator, the BZ is a considerably advanced "fun" module. It's ideally suited to the creation of complex modulation CVs via a curiously simple and rhythmic user interface.
Built in wide range clock with LED

Clock In accepts almost any wave form including audio frequencies

Two Clock Outs (one with narrow pulse)

Six octave based controls with +/- swings (center off) allow up to 64 step patterns ranging up to +/-10V

Four step Lag processor push button

Normal and Inverted outs

Handy Range Switch (+/-2V, +/-5V, +/-10V)

Gate In for external control. (Normalled to run continuously) Also excepts a Reset pulse

Use for complex CV generation, audio frequency division, gate generation

Use for note sequences especially with a quantizer such as the MW (Precise control of each note is not practical but the results are still quite useful)

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Encore Universal Event Generator is a Synthesis Technology, MOTM compatible module designed to be a versatile and useful addition to an already great modular system. The UEG can be used as an envelope generator, a complex LFO, or as a step sequencer.

Eight stages are provided with adjustable time and level for each stage, and they each have an LED which indicates the relative voltage output for that stage.

The top switch controls the major modes of the UEG. LOOPONLY mode will force the UEG to cycle between the loop points. This is essentially an LFO.

ONESHOT mode will cycle through all eight stages once, regardless of the duration of the gate input.

GATED allows a new set of options controlled by the second switch. In this mode, the module will start the envelope when it receives a gate, but it will also loop as long as the gate is held. Once the gate is released, there are two ways for the envelope to end. In RELEASE mode, the UEG will complete the current stage, then jump immediately to stage 8. In FINISH LOOP mode, it will simply complete all the stages before stopping.

The top position of the second switch is the STEP mode. In this mode, the UEG takes on a whole different personality: it becomes a step sequencer! It will advance through the 8 stages for each positive pulse on the GATE input.

The START and END loop switches allow the UEG to start a "loop" anywhere from stages 2 through 4, and end the loop between stages 5 and 7. These are used in LOOPONLY mode and in GATED mode.

The output waveform can have one of three slopes: linear, log, and step. These are shown graphically on the front panel.

The UEG also has a MANUAL GATE button, useful to trigger the UEG while setting it up.

The four 1/4" jacks along the bottom are the two inputs and two outputs. The leftmost jack is the GATE input and it requires a fairly clean pulse or squarewave input. (A Triangle wave will also work, but it needs to be fairly fast.)

The next jack is the TCV, or Time Control Voltage input. A 0 to 5 volt input will modulate all the time values to greater values.

The OUT jack is the main output waveform. It is a 0 to 5 volt analog voltage that corresponds to the front panel settings.

The TRIGOUT jack is the rightmost output and will fire off a short pulse at the conclusion of stage 8. It it also a 0 to 5 volt signal. This is useful to trigger other events in a MOTM system. For example, it could be used to trigger a second UEG to behave as a 16 stage sequence or envelope.

New feature: In LFO mode the TRIGOUT can output a pulse for each stage of the LFO or at the end of the LFO cycle.



http://www.encoreelectronics.com/cont_ueg1.html

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Encore Frequency Shifter is a Synthesis Technology, MOTM compatible module designed to add to a growing array of high quality analog modular systems.

The Encore Electronics Frequency Shifter is a hybrid analog implementation of the sought-after frequency shifting effect. A RISC microprocessor is used to generate a highly stable quadrature oscillator which is then used with analog multipliers to generate the frequency shifting effect. The quadrature oscillator outputs are analog signals from the output of a DAC and the audio input signal is never digitized and stays entirely in the analog domain.

This unusual device will produce effects ranging from the subtle to the extreme. For example, by employing the simultaneous up and down shift outputs, the on-board feedback controls, and a slight amount of shift with the fine-shift control, a stunning stereo infinite phasing effect is possible. Small shifts with the fine shift control will also produce lush vibrato and rotating-speaker-like effects. Larger amounts of shift can result in unusual and often bizarre inharmonic modifications of an input signal that must be heard to be believed.

The frequency shifter can seriously warp any input signal, from keyboards to guitars to vocals to drum machines.

The Encore Frequency Shifter features two frequency shift controls (coarse and fine), an input scaler capable of handling signals from line-level up to modular levels, two feedback controls for added sonic variety, and a CV input scaling control. It also has two controls to adjust the level of the quadrature oscillator's outputs. There are two inputs (one for audio signal and one for a frequency shift control voltage) and two outputs, one for up-shifted signal and one for down-shifted. The Encore Frequency Shifter is capable of continuous frequency shifting from 0.07Hz up to over 3000Hz. Carrier feedthrough is more than 50dB down with a properly scaled input signal; no companding is employed.

The frequency shifter operates by altering the frequencies of an input signal. The device shifts all frequency components of the input signal by an equal number of Hz. With this kind of shifting the harmonic relationships in the signal are not preserved. This is unlike a standard pitch shifter, which shifts all frequency components of an input signal by the same ratio, thus preserving the signal's harmonic intervals.

Note: This is preliminary information and subject to change.


http://www.encoreelectronics.com/cont_fs1.html

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread


This Module is a Modcanization of the classic Wiard
Synthesizer/Blacet MiniWave Voltage Controlled Wavetable Look-up Device.

Features:
256 Waveforms standard with expansion socket for a second prom with front panel selection switch
VC selection of wave and bank

Applications include:
audio waveform bank
complex LFO functions
random functions
non linear waveform distortion
quantizer


http://www.modcan.com/modhtml/miniwave.html
http://www.blacet.com/MW.html

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

From http://www.doepfer.com

This is a brand new Multitype Morphing Filter. This module contains completely new features that - as far as we know - are available for none of the other filters on the market: Probably more than 30 different filter types are available (different types of low pass, high pass, band pass, notch, all pass and completely new combined filter types) that can be passed through with a control voltage. Even the morphing time (i.e. how fast the next filter type comes up) is voltage controlled. The provisional A-107 page shows the most important features of the module and the filter response curves of the filters that are included so far. The module will be available summer 2003.

More:
: different types of low pass, high pass, band pass, notch, all pass and filters with new response curves that have no name up to now. The filter types we realized so far are shown in the graphics at the end of this page. The filters are organized in two groups of about 15 filters each. The transition between different filter types within one group can be soft (morphing) or hard (switching).
The filter was inspired by the ERWIK Musikelektronik Multimode Filter, which is based on the filter used in the Oberheim Matrix 12 resp. Xpander (thanks to Jesper Erwik Johansson for his assistance and permission to use his idea in our A-107 module). The possibilities of the A-107 go beyond these filter designs as a lot of new filter types are available and the transition between filters can be soft (morphing) or hard (switching).

The transistion between the different filter types is controlled by two parameters:

Filter Step (marked Step at the front panel)

Morphing Time (marked Morph at the front panel)
For both parameters manual control, one CV input with attenuator and one CV input without attenuator are available.

The ~ 30 filter types can be arranged in different filter chains (or filter orders/sequences) so that this sequence of filters is passed through while the control voltage changes from 0...+5V. Several chains can be programmed by the user with the following controls:

Step (button to address the step within the filter sequence in combination with the value encoder)

Filter (button to select the filter number that is assigned to the current step within the sequence in combination with the value encoder))

Chain (button to select the desired filter chain in combination with the value encoder))

Value (endless rotary encoder to change the parameter selected with the buttons)

3 digit Display (the first digit indicates of the current value shows Step "S", Filter "F" or Chain "C")

Additionally a "clocked" mode is available. This means that the filters of the currently selected filter chain are selected one after another. Each positive transition of the Clock signal calls up the next filter of the chain (jack socket marked Step Clock). A positive trigger at the Step Reset input (jack socket marked Step Clock) resets to the first filter of the current filter chain. This allows e.g. to switch between the filters of the currently selected filter chain in sync with a sequencer.

Of course the standard VCF controls are available: manual filter frequency control, one CV input with attenuator and one CV input without attenuator.
In addition voltage controlled resonance with manual control, CV input with attenuator and CV control without attenuator are available. For some filter types self-oscillation will be possible, but not for all.

On top of it a final VCA will be available (even with manual control, CV input with attenuator and CV input without attenuator).

The filter design is 100% analog (CEM filter chip). Only the morphing control and memory managing is carried out by a microcontroller.

Remark: Because of technical reasons the transition between the two filter groups cannot be carried out soft (as capacitors have to be switched). Soft transition (i.e. morphing) is possible only within the filter group (about 15 different filters each). Switching between filters causes a "click" if the filters are from different filter groups.

This is only a preliminary description of the planned module. The features are still subject to change and we do not guarantee that the module will be actually manufactured. This information should only be treated as a discussion basis.

Prospective price: about 275.00

Controls:

Manual Step
Step CV
Manual Morph.
Morph. CV
Manual Frequency
Frequency CV
Man. Resonance
Resonance
Man. Amplitude
Amplitude CV
Prg Buttons
Value encoder
3 digit display

In/Outputs:

Step CV 1
Step CV 2
Morph. CV 1
Morph. CV 2
Frequ. CV 1
Frequ. CV 2
Resonance CV1
Resonance CV2
Amplitude CV1
Amplitude CV2
Audio In
Audio Out
Step Clock
Step Reset



WOW!! Is this one kool! OINK OINK!

Last edited by elektro80 on Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:17 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

More examples?

This one is VERY kool!

http://www.doepfer.de/a100_man/a111_man.htm


Module A-111 (VCO 2) is a voltage controlled oscillator. The VCO has a range of about 12 octaves, and produces four waveforms simultaneously: pulse (rectangle), sawtooth, triangle and sine waves. The VCO's frequency is determined by the position of the range switch, tune and fine tune controls, and the voltage at the two pitch CV inputs, CV 1 and CV 2. Footage (the octave of the fundamental) is set by the Range control, which has seven octave steps. The Tune control is used for coarse tuning, and the Fine control for fine tuning of the VCO pitch. The A-111 can be modulated by both exponential and linear FM (frequency modulation). You can control the pulse width of the square wave either by hand, or by voltage control - Pulse Width Modulation, or PWM for short.
The A-111 has inputs for Hard Sync and Soft Sync.



-------

Well.. seems like a decent little VCO..
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

This one is cute. It has Q compensation ... nice feature

The SuperLadder-3 is a voltage controlled filter system. Cut-off frequency, resonance and envelope sweep depth are all voltage controlled. Based around the old classic the ladder filter, the SuperLadder is the complete filter section for a modular or standalone synth project. This new issue has been completely revised to sound better and give you more control over the sound.

The VCF may be built as a moog ladder or a TB303 diode ladder. Thus with the same PCB, you could make either a classic warm filter or a rather crude squelchier affair. Simply by fitting different links and a few component changes.

The module has as standard two low pass outputs; the traditional four pole output, and the one pole output. This gives a sharper edge to your sounds.

The module has a variable shape output. The issue 3 SuperLadder incorporates a feature first seen on the Orbital prototypes. A pot gives you an output that can be varied from one pole to four pole, via band pass in the middle. Band pass with moog warmth.

All the outputs are Q compensated. This means that the output volume will not drop significantly when you turn up the resonance pot. This design uses two VCAs to achieve voltage controlled resonance without the hassle. A beautiful sound.



http://www.oakleysound.co.uk/super.htm
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Oakley also has this little lag generator surprisingly named " The Little Lag Generator ". he he..

This is a very simple but useful little module to introduce 'smoothness' to CVs and waveforms. It doesn't just have the usual 'lag time' pot that some simple lag generators possess, but two separate UP and DOWN controls. The UP control will affect the speed at which the output of the module rises. The DOWN control affects the speed at which it falls.

Drive the unit with a gate signal and the module becomes an effective AR envelope generator.

Use it to process those lumpy CVs you get from your midi-CV convertor. Remove that zippering to create smooth changes over time.

Use it also to process the output of an envelope follower to create more controlled filter sweeps when used with a VCF. A new panel design for the Oakley EFG has incorporated the Little-Lag to create the EFG-deluxe module.

You have a choice of linear or 'logarithmic' output slopes. The logarithmic output allows for longish times of lag to be set up easily, roughly 8 seconds maximum lag time. The output moves quickly at first then slows to reach the final value. You get a more natural effect when using this mode. However, the disadvantage is that the unit is not sufficiently accurate to use for portamento applications in 'log' mode.

In linear mode, the output rises or falls in a straight line. It is classified in volts per second, as opposed to just time. The amount of time it takes depends on the front panel pots' positions AND the voltage change on the input. Generally, for small changes in voltage the linear output will appear to move quicker than its 'log' equivalent. The linear mode is very accurate and can be used to create linear portamento.

Synthech has one too .. for the MOTM.

From the syntech site:

The MOTM-820 is used to add slew to an input. The most common use would be to add portamento to a control voltage feeding a VCO. In analog keyboards with portamento (Moog called this glide) the rise and fall times were the same. This is because a simple RC filter is controlled by a single pot. The shape is the same: an exponential rise and fall. Although we are used to hearing this shape, the fact that we have an exponential voltage feeding an exponential response (1V/Oct of the VCO) means that musically we are limited.

Syntech claims this is the most advanced lag processor ever designed and they might be right:
Independent voltage control of both rise (UP) and fall (DOWN) times
Times variable from 500us to 5 minutes
Ganged UP/DOWN control to emulate standard portamento effects
A new SHAPE control that varies the glide slopes from Linear to Log
Remote or panel BYPASS to turn the effect off without any DC shift!

It can drive 3 VCOs (or other modules) from a single input. The output stage is a special "capacitive cable driver" for driving long cables (up to 20 feet) without any voltage drop.

Last edited by elektro80 on Tue Aug 19, 2003 10:48 pm; edited 3 times in total
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I am pretty sure Howard will go.. Ahummmmmm... and reread the product info a couple of times. Inventive patches using silly stuff like these can truly create some very expressive and weird sounds. The nice thing with modular CV control is that you can really take details of the sound into the twilight sound.. it is possibly to use midi input.. and use velocity for adding dynamic reverb or phase shifting.. or whatever.. insane possibilities.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

This one is REALLY nice.




The MOTM-700 is a bi-directional, dual SPDT switch that is "toggled" when an input control voltage exceeds a trip-point set by a panel knob. Special circuitry handles routing of audio (cross-fading VCAs) or control voltage (fast, low-offset switches).

The MOTM-700 has 2 identical sections, so we will discuss how one of them operates. The two are totally independent from each other, and by patchcords can be connected in series or parallel with each other, or to additional MOTM-700 modules.

Think of a SPDT (single-pole, double-throw) mechanical switch. When the switch is 'up', Signal A is connected to the "Common" terminal (let's call it 'X'). So we say, "A is routed to X". If the switch is 'down', then Signal B is connected to X. There are 2 ways of veiwing the connections: 2 inputs are selected to 1 output, OR 1 input is routed to 2 outputs. The switch doesn't care: it's truly bi-directional.

This is exactly how the MOTM-700 works! What makes it useful in any studio is that you control the selection with a control voltage! The MOTM-700 uses a circuit called a comparator that "compares" the input control voltage with another voltage, set by the panel pot SWITCH. The SWITCH control is adjustable from -5V to +5V.

Operation is easy to remember:

If the CV IN voltage is less than the SWITCH setting, then A and X are connected.
If the CV IN voltage is greater than the SWITCH setting, then B and X are connected.

So, what is it good for? The fun part is choosing the source of the CV input. Here are just a few examples:

Use a voltage-out footpedal. Pedal up, A routes to X. Pedal down, B routes to X.
Use an LFO waveform. A triangle will cause the A and B signals to "ping-pong" to X. Then the SWITCH setting determines the duty-cycle of the routing!
Use the S&H output from a MOTM-101. The SWITCH setting becomes a voltage-controlled probability function! The higher you set the voltage, the greater the chance A routes to X.
Use the output from your keyboard controller. Instant voltage-controlled splitpoint control!

A MODE switch selects if audio or control voltages are being routed. In the AUDIO position, a special IC actually switches by a very fast cross-fading between channels. This eliminates "pops" and "clicks". The IC is rated for CD quality switching: better than 90dB SNR with less than 0.002% THD. Shielded RG-174 cables are used for all audio signals.

If the MODE is voltage, then a high-speed, low resistance CMOS switch is used (NOT the cheesy '4066' types!) This IC is good enough for switching VCO control voltages without adding drift or offsets! It can also switch at audio rates as well! This can result in some very bizarre timbres.


[/img]

Last edited by elektro80 on Tue Aug 19, 2003 10:52 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Another VCO from Syntech

"The MOTM-300 Ultra VCO represents a milestone in analog synthesizer design. Using only the finest available circuitry, the Ultra VCO has unmatched performance where it's needed most: stability and tracking. Using 4 separate temperature compensation servo loops, the average drift over 12 hours is typically 0.01% or about thirty times better than a Moog 921B VCO! Why do we call it the Ultra VCO? Because the tracking circuitry uses an ultra-matched differential pair transistor array that will hold over a minimum of 15 octaves! That's twice the range of a piano.

Although we put the focus of the design on stability, the MOTM-300 is indeed a 'full-featured' VCO. Sine, Saw, Triangle, and Pulse waveforms are all available simultaneously. PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) with initial pulse width and depth creates complex spectra. Other features include:



Dedicated 1volt/octave input with military-spec 25ppm 0.1% summing resistor
2 separate Frequency Modulation (FM) inputs, each with it's own attenuator
Linear FM with switchable AC or DC coupling
PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) from DC to over 15Khz
Hard and Soft sync option. Master Sync I/O jack.
Low power consumption, only requires +-15VDC @ 60ma.
All audio signals wired with coaxial cable for lowest noise and crosstalk
Low-drift op amps and precision resistors used throughout
10 volts peak-peak audio outputs
Frequency range from 0.2Hz to over 38Khz
2U panel width
The cornerstone of any synthesizer is the VCO. We feel the MOTM-300 Ultra VCO has "raised the bar" and quite simply, is the most accurate and best-sounding analog VCO ever offered. "

Yeah.. no wonder the Syntech guys are pleased with this one!

Last edited by elektro80 on Tue Aug 19, 2003 10:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

One last comment. Very often I find that the module vendors have put up some pretty dull sound example files. The examples rarely shows how the module really can be used. For that you better use your imagination instead.

I guess one of my pieces, "A Scanner Darkly" [ http://artists.mp3s.com/artist_song/2739/2739441.html ]can be a good example of how good old analog patches from hell can be recreated digitally. The bass that kicks in at the start is really a standard Moog/Octave Instruments style patch with a square and sinus that is step sequenced but the signal is split into left and right channel signals.. some reverb is added.. a control voltage is moving the delay time and level with an offset between the channels and the two channels are then being stepfiltered independently-- ( each filter step is carefully adjusted in the sequencer ) and then we have a shaking bass sequence going in stereo.. and then I have mixed in a mono tap of the clean signal but have stepfiltered this one with a walking notch filter.( Tip: Always have some good compressors and limiters handy.. and.. always have at least a 3 band parametric equalizer before the compressor/limiters - very effective - even better is to have a CV controlled parametric equaliser that can be sequenced too.. Smile ) All this is pretty standard as sequenced analog modular patches goes but it is quite possible to do the same in the digital domain. The way it sounds now is pretty much how I prefer to remember how it sounded back then. Pretty much all of my recordings uses traditional analog patch ideas like this one.

I have often tried to explain how I make those distorted voices that move dynamically in stereo. The answer is vocoding. For some ideas about how a vocoding system can be set up check out the Doepfer system at: http://www.doepfer.de/a100_man/A100_System_Vocoder_1.htm

Try vocoding a distorted reverb feed from a synced VCO pair with some PWM on the suboctave ( hmm.. better have it at least 45% clean signal mixed in ) - and use stepfiltering both on the carrier and the modulator. Preferably use a stereo reverb somewhere in there in order to split the signal before it is finally routed into a stero pair of ADSRs. -Forgot to mention what should be the carrier and modulator.. but that can vary.. great fun is to send slave CV/gate to some other synth .. make a cool but messy patch and route this one to a talk box - and then back into the vocoding chain. One cool effect is to switch what is the modulator and carrier. A pair of autopan modules.. or stepsequenced pan modules ( prefereably with a lag inserted ) can swing the signals back and forth. Great fun.

(- correction/addition: . Imagine two standalone pan units. mono in - the unit can pan this between two outputs. L can be carrier and R can be modulator. OK.. Pipe each audio source into its own pan unit and use invertion or whatever so that when signal A swings from carrier to modulator, then signal B does the reverse. We then have crossfading between the two. )

Filter resonances can be used in many ways. A second patch can be used tracking a keyboard for controlling resonances in the main signal. Clever modules can be used for adding, subtracting and dividing CVs. With a little care a nice patch can be made for handplaying improvised resonance patterns on top of sequencer lines. There is almost no end to the mayhem one can do with synths/modular synths.

A little digression about midi. A big problem these days is that midi delivers steps and not a continous stream of values. Using midi for control of parameters that one would use CVs for in an analog mosular synth is one BAD solution. This does not mean that midi is useless.. far from it.. but certain tasks is not suited for midi. We need something FAR better right now.

OK.. I mentioned sequencers... there are a lot of incredibly cool new designs out there now. I have previously in another thread somewhere metioned the Zeit. here is one from Cynindustries. http://www.scampers.com/cyndustries/milton_main.cfm
Please read the product blurb for some interesting ideas.

Posted Image, might have been reduced in size. Click Image to view fullscreen.

Last edited by elektro80 on Tue Aug 19, 2003 10:33 pm; edited 2 times in total
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Sheeeeeet.. now I have started.. someone make me stop!

OK.. when using sequencers, devices like the Cynindustries Burst generator will be indespensable.

The Burst Generator replies to a trigger input pulse - with a rotary switch selectable string of from one-to-nine pulses out. Bada, Bing! Bing! Bing! There's a choice between the adjustable internal clock or an external one, as well as logical outs representing when an "Event" is in progress, looping, or completed...
This can be used at slow speeds for example, to count the number of times a sequencer repeats before interrupting it's cycle, and then triggering another event to begin! Or the Burst Generator module can be used at pseudo audio frequencies for rasp and washboard effects.

When triggered by a keyboard, this versatile module can easily generate percussive Hammond Organ or woodwind type chiffs on each note played.

Lots of auto-compositional fun linking these together, or with the excellent Modcan 17A Sequencer or the Stone Gate Sequencers!
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wow! You have put together a great bit of information about new and innovative analog synth modules. Facinating. Thanks man...

Some of these things would be easy to patch up and try out on my Nord Modular. Other things are sorta not well defined, like the spacializer module.

OMG, I'm starting to visualize another rack of hardware! I better go get some drug to moderate this attack.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Smile Well.. yeah.. I started out on this thread in order to give you guys some inspiration for making new interesting patches. A lot of the ideas can be implemented using digital gear.. but... hmm.. A couple walls full of such modules would be nice too. BTW: I am looking forward to having you over in september. Espen just got back and I guess we can get the lecture thingie sorted out. Smile
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2003 2:28 am    Post subject: All hail the HolySynth Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I wonder if Stein sleeps at night, but, by the fact that he has to take a nap in the afternoon I guess not Shocked
The avalanche of modules he shows us is scary and scary are the names of some of them:
Psycho Shift Register
Super Psycho LFO
Dark Star Chaos
Combo-Distro Power Cards

They look like weapons for the final and conclusive battle between the forces of good and evil, the Armageddon, not like synth modules.
Only high ranking ministers of the Church of the HolySynth can be authorized to perform using the abovementioned modules.
Their Performances equal sacred rites as the Performers are mediatory agents between humans and the SynthGod.
All hail the HolySynth Twisted Evil

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Politics is the entertainment division of the military industrial complex - Frank Zappa
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2003 2:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Axis of Synth??
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2003 2:39 am    Post subject: an humble Synth Prayer Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I, humble synthesist and knob wrangler, pray ye SynthGod, to give me the force to withstand your presence and to show me the way that will bring me to the SynthHeaven.
Do not let my force to Self-Oscillate
Let me control my Voltage
and Amplify my strength
and ......do not turn the power off on me Exclamation

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

An excellent prayer! I have a supplier of holy statues of Wendy Carlos and Laurie Spiegel. I am sending you his URL by email. Reminds me, this guy I know has a little box of what is supposed to be the nail clippings from Robert Moog. Dunno if they are authentic.. but they should fetch a decent sum on eBay.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

elektro80 wrote:
An excellent prayer! I have a supplier of holy statues of Wanda Carlos and Laurie Spiegel.

I guess you mean Wendy Carlos of which I am a devotee Very Happy

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Corrected, we were watching A Fish Called Wendy --- sorry----- WANDA..
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2003 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

elektro80 wrote:
...this guy I know has a little box of what is supposed to be the nail clippings from Robert Moog.

you know...one day I was in the same room with him.
I could almost touch him. Holy Synth!
I was attending a class of Music Synthesis at Berklee, the door of the room opens and Robert Moog, in person, materialize himself in front of us. WOW!! Shocked
We were talking about subtractive synthesis so our instructor (a wise guy) asks him why on his synths resonance was called Q.
Do you know what was his answer? "I do not know". Isn't fantastic?
Isn't it a zen story to tell to your children and grandchildren?
The Godfather of Synths does not recall why he called resonance "Q"!!
Wasn't Q a character of the James Bond movies. Maybe Mr. Moog had seen a 007 movie before starting to build his first synthesizer
Idea Twisted Evil Shocked

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