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 Forum index » DIY Hardware and Software » Microcontrollers and Programmable Logic
Book / Magazine / Web Based Learning Suggestions.
Post new topic   Reply to topic Moderators: State Machine
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State Machine
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:01 am    Post subject:  Book / Magazine / Web Based Learning Suggestions.
Subject description: Place to suggest books, articles, journals, whatever ..........
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I would say that for forum members who want to become familiar with VHDL to design hardware, I suggest reading this book. I recommend that you get some kind of FPGA or CPLD development board so that you may try the VHDL examples. It has gotten lots of very good reviews and I own it myself also .. Very Happy

Circuit Design with VHDL

http://www.amazon.com/Circuit-Design-VHDL-Volnei-Pedroni/dp/0262162245/ref=cm_lmf_tit_25_rsrssi0

Quote:
Book Description
This textbook teaches VHDL using system examples combined with programmable logic and supported by laboratory exercises. While other textbooks concentrate only on language features, Circuit Design with VHDL offers a fully integrated presentation of VHDL and design concepts by including a large number of complete design examples, illustrative circuit diagrams, a review of fundamental design concepts, fully explained solutions, and simulation results. The text presents the information concisely yet completely, discussing in detail all indispensable features of the VHDL synthesis. The book is organized in a clear progression, with the first part covering the circuit level, treating foundations of VHDL and fundamental coding, and the second part covering the system level (units that might be located in a library for code sharing, reuse, and partitioning), expanding upon the earlier chapters to discuss system coding.

Part I, "Circuit Design," examines in detail the background and coding techniques of VHDL, including code structure, data types, operators and attributes, concurrent and sequential statements and code, objects (signals, variables, and constants), design of finite state machines, and examples of additional circuit designs. Part II, "System Design," builds on the material already presented, adding elements intended mainly for library allocation; it examines packages and components, functions and procedures, and additional examples of system design. Appendixes on programmable logic devices (PLDs/FPGAs) and synthesis tools follow Part II. The book's highly original approach of teaching through extensive system examples as well as its unique integration of VHDL and design make it suitable both for use by students in computer science and electrical engineering.
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Danno Gee Ray



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I would also like to recommend a magazine to anyone interested in PIC programming. It's a UK publication called "Everyday Practical Electronics". They usually run a couple of projects every month (mostly PIC based). Have run very good series on basics called "Teach In" which are invaluable for beginners. They also sell CD's with tons of useful articles and code. Give them a look. www.epemag.co.uk and www.epemag.com
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State Machine
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

One of my favorite magazines. I have had a subscription since 1988, from the very first issue !!! Great embedded computer applications journal.

http://www.circellar.com/

Bill
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State Machine
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

How could we forget the Computer Music Journal from MIT Press !!
I just got my extended subscription yesterday. I


http://www.mitpressjournals.org/loi/comj?cookieSet=1

Bill
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State Machine
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Hi all .....

Here is a link to the latest edition of "Programming and Customizing the PIC Microcontroller". It has mixed reviews, mostly good, but I think it a very good book and I own them from the first editions. This, in conjunction with the data sheets, and information on the Microchip website would be the best combination to learn and create projects with these MCU devices.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0071472878/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

Bill
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frijitz



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

State Machine wrote:
Hi all .....

Here is a link to the latest edition of "Programming and Customizing the PIC Microcontroller". It has mixed reviews, mostly good, but I think it a very good book and I own them from the first editions. This, in conjunction with the data sheets, and information on the Microchip website would be the best combination to learn and create projects with these MCU devices.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0071472878/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

Bill

I hate, hate, hate, hate, hate that book! I agree with the Amazon reviewer who said it is the worst technical book ever written in any subject area. You cannot learn from that book if you are just starting out, as he explains the beginning concepts in terms of the advanced ones. Plus it's full of mistakes, impossible to understand writing, etc. But some people like it. I guess it's OK if you already have some PIC experience. I ended up mainly learning from the Microchip docs, which are generally clear and error free (although, not entirely). I have used the Peatman book quite a bit, also.

Very Happy

Ian
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Blue Hell
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

frijitz wrote:
I ended up mainly learning from the Microchip docs


Me too, but it might not be the best starting point when one has no experience programming in assembly. When I started with the z80 in the old days I did read some books, as I simply didn't have the concept at that time of what a computer or a CPU was. Also I think it would be a good idea to get a bit of an idea of what debugging is and what you need for that. (For Microchip the mpasm tools work pretty well, especially the simulator)

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frijitz



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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Blue Hell wrote:
When I started with the z80 in the old days I did read some books, as I simply didn't have the concept at that time of what a computer or a CPU was.

I started out on Z80 also. I had several good books on that processor. They don't write 'em like that anymore. Sad

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State Machine
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Quote:
I started out on Z80 also. I had several good books on that processor. They don't write 'em like that anymore.


The Z80 was cool ! My first home computer was one I designed and built 27 years ago using an Intel 8085 CPU. I did not really like the 6800 back then. I must say though, the 8085 really had a quirky serial interface of you want to call it that. Not sure of you remember the SID and SOD pins and the assembler commands that went with them? Anyway, my CPU board was wire wrapped of course and the terminal interface was of course built with discrete transistors Very Happy Most of my learning was from all the Intel data sheets and from my microcomputer classes I was taking back then . It's kind of fun reminiscing about our beginnings in electronics I think Very Happy At work, back in the early 80's, the company was using Data General NOVA III mainframes. The CPU board was 1.5' square !!!!! I am not talking about a board with a microprocessor on it, the board was the processor Very Happy All the elements of a modern 16 bit CPU but spread over 100's of chips .........

Bill
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State Machine
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

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I hate, hate, hate, hate, hate that book!


So tell me, do you hate this book. Your not being clear enough Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

Bill
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2008 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Danno Gee Ray wrote:
I would also like to recommend a magazine to anyone interested in PIC programming. It's a UK publication called "Everyday Practical Electronics". They usually run a couple of projects every month (mostly PIC based). Have run very good series on basics called "Teach In" which are invaluable for beginners. They also sell CD's with tons of useful articles and code. Give them a look. www.epemag.co.uk and www.epemag.com


Nuts&Volts publishes a monthly mag and has PIC & Stamp projects now & then. http://www.nutsvolts.com/

This mag picked up where Popular Electronics left off.
Too bad Byte back issues aren't available on DVD Sad

I had a horrible intro to assembly in the Navy, then got some real hands-on with a 6809 in a Tandy/Radio Shack Computer, but never got proficient at it, a little bit of 68K and Data General Eclipse computers at work, but again, just enough to wiggle some bits and scope them.

I think I learned more by looking at a source/asm debug trace for Microsoft's friggin Visual C 1.52, that generated the WRONG offset into a class which had too many levels of inheritance. That was under DOS and easy to track down.

But still, never got proficient at it Wink

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State Machine
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

This is a very good reference also. "Computer Music Tutorial". I enjoy the Roads compositions in granular synthesis also so I recommend maybe getting his "Point Line Cloud" CD. Link is below also.

http://www.amazon.com/Computer-Music-Tutorial-Curtis-Roads/dp/0262680823/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200670684&sr=8-1

Link to "Point Line Cloud"

http://www.amazon.com/Point-Line-Cloud/dp/B000S580LS/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=dmusic&qid=1200670882&sr=8-2

Bill
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State Machine
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Here is a book I own and although the hardware aspects are dated, lots of the principals are still valid. The book is called "Musical Applications of Microprocessors"

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0810457539/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

One reader reviews :

Quote:
I highly recommend it to anyone who really wants to understand digital audio signal processing. To get the most from this book you should have some knowledge of math at the level of trigonometry and algebra, prior exposure to electronics and microprocessors, and some knowledge of music.


Quote:
chapters 12 through 18, is the real meat of the book and the part that best stands the test of time. This section is about digital synthesis and sound modification.


Quote:
This book is also a great companion to the much more modern and highly recommended "Digital Audio Signal Processing" by Udo Zolzer. Do not confuse that book with the book "Digital Audio Processing" by Doug Coulter. Coulter's book is pure garbage, even at the bargain basement price at which people are selling their used copies.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

For those interested in learning Verilog:

http://www.asic-world.com/verilog/veritut.html

A free tutorial which I found very useful to learn Verilog as a complete novice. Using this tutorial and playing with LED and switches projects was the key to my learning Verilog.


For a good introduction to DSP:

http://www.dspguide.com/

After reading this (more than once) I understand many of the basic principles of DSP. The information I found there made it possible for me to understand and design several different digital filters.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2013 10:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

After I mentioned that I was using 8-bit PICs in chat, Blue_Hell said why not use 16-it PICs for future projects?
So I started reading a bit on the web, and found this tutorial for the PIC24 series of 16-bit microcontrollers. Very basic, but it helped to give me a start in the 16-bit world.

http://www.engscope.com/pic24-tutorial/

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