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 Forum index » Instruments and Equipment » Kyma
So what are the most interesting things to try out on Kyma X
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soundmodel



Joined: Aug 05, 2017
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Location: Finland

PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2018 2:35 pm    Post subject: So what are the most interesting things to try out on Kyma X Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

So what are the most interesting things to try out on Kyma X?

I haven't had the time to delve into it yet, but I was today reading through the reference for prototypes.

http://www.symbolicsound.com/zzz/pub/Learn/KymaManual/PrototypesReference.pdf

And to me it seems like a lot of the stuff there is not special.

But maybe connecting stuff together makes it special?

But what should I try?
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robsol
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2018 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Traditionally, Kyma is known to be good at FFT stuff like morphing between sounds and resynthesis - play around with the various analysing tools and prototypes, and the Tau editor.

I believe that computers have caught up with what made Kyma special 10 years ago, but it still has some things going for it. It sounds great to me, in most cases, and it doesn't take long to get something together compared with, say Reaktor or Max/MSP. Obviously Kyma is also higher level than those.

The speed of which you can cobble something together is linked to whether you get along with its user interface or not. It can be rather backwards sometimes, and funnels you into a specific way of thinking. But once you have gotten used to that, and know it fairly wel, it's no surprise to me that it is popular in Hollywood movies for sound design. In other words, it's easy and quick to get something together when you're on a tight deadline.

Whether that makes it special or not is up to you to decide. It does have a certain myth appeal amongst people who have never used it I suspect. But bottom line is that I still like it, even though I have a Paca for sale - after trying several modular environments and concluding that I'll still probably keep it.

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soundmodel



Joined: Aug 05, 2017
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2018 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Initially I did get it as a sort of high-level synth/DSP API. Because even if I speculated that a lot of the stuff could be currently implementable on a conventional PC and not necessarily requiring custom computer, the process of rewriting or porting the Kyma library would be laborious. Thus, while it exists, it's likely faster to just use it.

I have imagined that FFT and granular based stuff would sound better on a DSP that's able to process without overheads caused by general purpose CPUs, but I've learned that with regards to sound quality the speed of computation doesn't really matter. What Kyma could allow though is more processing power specific to certain DSP processes.

For example, some years back it was thought that it'd be imposible to run 600 partials additive or e.g. vocoding on a general purpose computer. While a Kyma of some sorts could handle it in real-time.

Another thing is yes the morphing thing. I think for a long time Kyma was perhaps the only library that had implemented spectral morphing. Nowadays there are few VSTs that also do it.
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