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 Forum index » DIY Hardware and Software » Circuit Bending
mouse IR.sensors
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rubendelacosta



Joined: Dec 25, 2005
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Location: lisbon

PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2005 5:09 am    Post subject: mouse IR.sensors Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

hey!
I found this IR-sensors inside an old mouse(ok...every mouses have it...I just didn't know) and they look pretty cool, but i just cant figure out how to plug'em to a toy...each sensor has 4pins, and they look like transistors.

so...any of you guys have any ideia how connect them to a toy?

thank you!
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Uncle Krunkus
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2005 5:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

One side is an I.R. Led, and the other is a photo-transistor. It's not a simple interface, but it's not impossible. I'd start by trying out a simple buffer made out of a 2N3904 transistor or some other similar switching transistor.
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rubendelacosta



Joined: Dec 25, 2005
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Location: lisbon

PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2005 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

thanks!
but tha hard part for me is to figure out the pins part! they're four...and i don't know what is what...
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jksuperstar



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2005 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Does the mouse still work? Do you have a Digital Multi-meter?

1st you can find the ground: One pin of the LED half should go to ground, the other should go through a resistor (for current limiting).

For the phototransistor half, 1 pin should go to power, and the other to a resistor, which in turn goes to ground. The phototransistor will be a short when it has no light going into it, or higher resistance when light enters. The ratio of it's "resistance" to the fixed resistor is your output. So tap onto this pin for your control voltage. This, in turn, could be amplified if needed as the Uncle suggested.
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ian-s



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2005 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Have optical mice been around long enough to be considdered 'old'?

In any case, both types require support chips to do anything useful, The optical interrupter style has a sensor for each slotted disk, each sensor produces two clock pulse trains shifted by 90deg. The following logic chip can work out which direction the wheel is turning by which pulse goes high first. This can be done with a 4000 series flip flop I think,
I have no idea how the optical sensors, which emit visible light, work.

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jksuperstar



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2005 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The true optical mouse your thinking of Ian actually use a small CCD camera, and track any edge or line that falls on a specific focal plane. It would be easier (in my book) to just interface to the PS2 serial interface that they have with a microcontroller (or PC software) than to jerry rig those.

However, the "other" optical mice, the ones with a ball and IR interrupter, could still prove to be useful somehow.

Oh, yeah, those with the mouse & optical interrupter might have either 2 phottransistors on each roller, or use an A>D converter. This is because the interrupter creates a 4-phase signal, which allows the sensors to detect direction, as well as speed. So the signal output from one of those photosensors might actually be a 4 step sequence (which moves through it's steps VERY quickly when you move the ball, maybe it'd make a good LFO?)
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