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 Forum index » Instruments and Equipment » Soft synths
OK another question for the experts... signal processors
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Olvidame



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PostPosted: Sun Mar 07, 2004 11:02 pm    Post subject: OK another question for the experts... signal processors Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I need to make my voice sound like a robot for a project in Sonar. I really don't want to buy a hardware effects processor or vocoder. Is there a plugin that can do something similar that anybody is aware of?
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seraph
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2004 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I do not know about Sonar but applications like Propellerhead Reason or Emagic Logic Pro could easily achieve the required effect (both include a virtual vocoder) Very Happy
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2004 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

there's alo native intruments' Vokator as well as tons of stand-alone DirectX effects and vst plugins. try this: http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~thman/VST/vst-alleff.htm

or do a google search for free vsts.
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Amos



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 30, 2004 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

OR you could try a granular synthesis of your voice... set the granule size to be very small and the attack/decay to be very abrupt... if you can use a lot of granules very quickly you may get a sort of aliased, stutter-humm-buzz effect to the vocals. I use Audiomulch for this sort of thing.
But it is easier to tweek around until you find the range of effect you are looking for than it is to explain such a thing...

On second thought, look for a vst-vocoder as suggested above. Granulation is very fun but probably less useful for your application

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elektro80
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 3:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Prosoniq OrangeVocoder is cool too.


Check it out

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ian-s



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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

If you want to break from the ‘traditional’ vocoder robot voice. Why not speak in a monotone, then chop up all the vowels etc with a wave editor, maybe loop some of them. Paste them back together in mostly the same order then apply selective pitch shifting for an artificial intonation. I think when robots eventually do speak; they won’t sound like a vocoder.
Check out the bell labs online text to speech synthesiser, don’t have the URL handy but you can google it. It will give you a wave or mp3 file of anything you type into a box, sounds realistic but mechanical at the same time.
BTW I think bell labs invented the vocoder originally, although I could be wrong about that.
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elektro80
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 5:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

A vocoder is pretty cool. You can use it or so many different things. I use it mostly for instrument sounds and not voice.

i checked out the http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/~thman/VST/vst-eff2.htm


Cool!

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 01, 2004 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The vocoder was originally designed as a signal compression device. The idea was what speach could be modeled by a exciter buzz and a set of changing set bandpass filters called format filters. By sending simple low-bandwidth control signals to the buzz and the filters's gain controls, you could synthesize speech. The real time analyzers were pretty costly, but there were systems built which worked. People didn't like them because the voices didn't sound like the speaker.

This model has been used on many text to speech synthesizers. It's so well know now that it's virtually a cliche. The biggest use for the vocoder has been as a sound effects gizmo and musical instrument. When you expand these vocoders to use large numbers of very narrow filters you approach the analysis/resynthesis techniques used so much today in some of the more powerful systems, like Kyma.

My guess is that in the future robots won't use this voice technique becuase it will sound dated and old fashoned. Already real robots can speak with natural sounding voices. Then again, it may become retro chic.

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