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 Forum index » DIY Hardware and Software » Lunettas - circuits inspired by Stanley Lunetta
My CMOS/Lunetta challenge digital logic sound making machine
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sndbyte



Joined: Jun 26, 2009
Posts: 117
Location: sf

PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2011 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I'm using 5 volts just because I'm pretty sure it's standard practice when working with CMOS chips. I imagine the thing will perform a bit more predictably when using 5 volts than if I were using a 9volt battery. I think a 9volt battery will lose it's voltage over time and your circuit at one point in time will be working on 8 volts, then later at 7 volts, then 6, etc. I could be totally wrong though.

The component after R2 in the osc schematic (page 3) is an LED. It will flash when the oscillator swings between 5volts and ground. It is helpful at lower frequencies and also when you are modulating the oscillator at the modulation input. You could remove the LED and the oscillator should work just the same (it may even oscillate at a higher frequency without the LED).
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Paradigm X



Joined: Feb 15, 2011
Posts: 286
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2011 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

sndbyte wrote:
I'm using 5 volts just because I'm pretty sure it's standard practice when working with CMOS chips. I imagine the thing will perform a bit more predictably when using 5 volts than if I were using a 9volt battery. I think a 9volt battery will lose it's voltage over time and your circuit at one point in time will be working on 8 volts, then later at 7 volts, then 6, etc. I could be totally wrong though.


Oh ok, thanks, didnt realise that. I didnt have a 7805 as it happens, but a lm317t, but am making an order for some banana jacks now (seems to be the best modular connection), so am grabbing a few 7805s.

sndbyte wrote:
The component after R2 in the osc schematic (page 3) is an LED. It will flash when the oscillator swings between 5volts and ground. It is helpful at lower frequencies and also when you are modulating the oscillator at the modulation input. You could remove the LED and the oscillator should work just the same (it may even oscillate at a higher frequency without the LED).


Cool, great, my reading of schematics and understanding circuits is getting much better, thanks for your help and detailed notes. This challenege is proving very useful.

BTW, your page 11 is missing, dont know if theres anything on there?

Didnt get much further last night, but learnt a lot, going from breadboard to stripboard is an interesting challenge too, spent a couple of hours getting a layout together, again your notes were helpful. Didnt have the correct switches for the cap switch so again ordered them (expensive hobby!) so will have a go soon.

Thanks

Ben
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Cynosure
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Joined: Dec 11, 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 5:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Paradigm X wrote:
I notice your using 5v rather than 9v, any reasons for this? Im just using a battery at this stage, although i do have a 7805 at home, could use that.

I think the general rule is to use a power source that is about 3V higher than your regulator. A 9V battery will start at 9V, but will fade to 6V over time. A 5V regulator ensures that your circuit operates the same no matter what voltage is coming out of the battery.

If you want a 9V circuit, then you should be using a 12V supply with a 7809 regulator.
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Paradigm X



Joined: Feb 15, 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Oh ok, i was just using the battery direct to the circuit, like in the Nic Collins (admittedly rather simple) book.

It works for now but will incorporate a 7805 once they arrive.

Cheers
Smile
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richardc64



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

A few minor points:

CMOS will work at up to 15V, but limiting it to 5V will allow mixing 74HC- or even 74LS- if you need to use a function that doesn't exist, or is hard to find, in CD4xxx.

9V battery power will immediately drop to something like 8.4volts as soon as any load is connected. (Something about each cell's internal resistance, IIRC.) Because of this immediate and unavoidable voltage drop, 5V logic could safely be powered by 4 AAs. When it starts acting weird you'd know it's time to replace the batteries.

The Drop Out voltage for 3-terminal regulators is around 2volts, So for a 5Volt regulator, you're good down to 7volts input.

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sndbyte



Joined: Jun 26, 2009
Posts: 117
Location: sf

PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Paradigm X wrote:


BTW, your page 11 is missing, dont know if theres anything on there?


Ben


I didn't post page 11 because it was just my notes on building the case... no circuits.

Here it is:


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sndbyte



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

After using all my chips in the grab bag (at least one of each type), I still had some extra panel space. So I added 3 circuits to my case using other CMOS chips I had on hand. Here are the designs below.


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sndbyte



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

And here is the layout of each case. Each wooden case has 4 panels. Panel number 1 starts on the far left. I'll detail each panel and what the input and outputs are in a later post.

The red circles are outputs. The grey circles are inputs. Large circles are pots and there are a few switches that are in a light gray. All the small circles are leds (except the little white circles in the corners... those are screw holes).

I designed these panels in Open Office Draw, printed them and used them as a template for drilling.


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sndbyte



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Here are my notes for panels 1 to 4 housed in the 1st wooden case.


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sndbyte



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2011 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

These are the notes for panels 5 to 8 housed in the 2nd wooden case.


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tjookum



Joined: May 25, 2010
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

you are a machine! Well done, it looks great.
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adambee7



Joined: Apr 04, 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Thats mighty impressive. thats a decent book's worth. Very Happy Very Happy
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JingleJoe



Joined: Nov 10, 2011
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

sndbyte, you strike me as the kind of person who has a really clean workbench and perhaps a supporting father and a golden retreiver or labrador which fetches your paper in the morning while you drink coffee.
I am envious.
Carry on the good work anyway, I want to hear this device in action.
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Paradigm X



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

It is excellent notekppeing, and very helpful.

Mines kind of been sat to one side recently, need to get back on it Embarassed

Thanks again sndbyte.

Needs moar audio samples!

Cheers
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