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 Forum index » DIY Hardware and Software
MTA Connectors..using a screwdriver???
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Tim Servo



Joined: Jul 16, 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:49 pm    Post subject: MTA Connectors..using a screwdriver???
Subject description: Colors and coding
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LOL, although there are many compulsive engineers out there, the different colored MTA connectors are for different wire gauges. Check the Mouser catalog, and it will tell you which color goes with which gauge of wire (Red = 22, White = 24, Blue = 26, Green = 28 ).

Tim (color coding my color crayons) Servo
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elektro80
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2007 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

None of these are carbon friendly? Laughing
OK.. this means I´ll have to plant some trees!

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crashlander42



Joined: Oct 21, 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2007 11:53 pm    Post subject: Re: MTA Connectors..using a screwdriver???
Subject description: Colors and coding
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Tim Servo wrote:
LOL, although there are many compulsive engineers out there, the different colored MTA connectors are for different wire gauges. Check the Mouser catalog, and it will tell you which color goes with which gauge of wire (Red = 22, White = 24, Blue = 26, Green = 28 ).


Shocked Wow. I really didn't think the colors meant anything.

Learning is fun. yay. Very Happy

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Etaoin



Joined: Jun 30, 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Interesting pics. Those headers seem to be completely different from the ones I use. Mine are completely DIY friendly. I don't need any special tools.


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Randaleem



Joined: May 17, 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 1:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Etaoin wrote:
Interesting pics. Those headers seem to be completely different from the ones I use. Mine are completely DIY friendly. I don't need any special tools.

Hi Etaoin!

Indeed, a great many types of perfectly acceptable connectors exist!

One difference between the MTA's and your posted type is that the MTA's grip the header pin from two sides, rather than one side only, pressing the pin between them instead of against the plastic housing. Some feel that this results in a more robust and better long term "gas tight" connection.

You see the same kind of variation in DIP sockets, with single leaf, dual leaf and machined pin types. And Gold versus Tin. Some people swear that it matters, others have had years of good experience with the single contact types.

I personally would choose differently for a synth which will see a lot of road time, compared to one which is studio bound.

What do you use to crinp the wires to these connectors of yours? Do you solder them?

Kind regards, Randal
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Etaoin



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Randaleem wrote:
What do you use to crinp the wires to these connectors of yours? Do you solder them?


I put the pin in a small vice to hold it steady and add a little dab of solder in the middle to hold the wire, then solder the wire and crimp the end using needle nose pliers.

it's a "good enough for me" type of connector Wink

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Randaleem



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 4:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Etaoin wrote:
it's a "good enough for me" type of connector Wink

Good enough for most, I'd bet! And no expensive tools, as you said.

Thank you Etaoin!

Kind regards, Randal
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Etaoin



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 4:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

And as I needed to make some anyway:


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Header pin in vice with a bit of solder
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Solder in wire
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Crimped
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loss1234



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 4:56 am    Post subject:   Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

i want to attract bull
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Randaleem



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Etaoin wrote:
And as I needed to make some anyway:


Hi again, Etaoin. I'm glad you posted these. Your pic, header 3 shows detail I'd missed in your earlier connector pic. You DO have 3 side contact with the pin with these. Excellent. Good enough for anybody, I'd say!

FWIW, Waldom/Molex makes an inexpensive yellow-handled pliers crimp tool that will work on these connectors to eliminate even the soldering. Maybe 15USD ? I'm mentioning it for completeness of the information in this thread. It works really well for this type of connector.

It has W-HT1921 stamped on the nose. It also works well for the PC disk drive power connectors mentioned earlier in the thread, and for molex .063 round pins and sockets. Rolls the wire and strain relief wings of the connector just as well as a more expensive tool. Has a crappy wire cutter/stripper I never use, and a bolt/screw cutter from 4-40 to 10-32.

EDIT: http://www.action-electronics.com/molex62.htm (Many pics of connectors and crimpers, I have also the # PHT-DS-STMP red-handled open barrel crimper shown near the bottom of this page and it too works well. Between the red and yellow handled tool, nearly everything except MTA's and machined pin types is easily crimped.

Kind regards, Randal
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v-un-v
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 6:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Etaoin wrote:
Randaleem wrote:
What do you use to crinp the wires to these connectors of yours? Do you solder them?


I put the pin in a small vice to hold it steady and add a little dab of solder in the middle to hold the wire, then solder the wire and crimp the end using needle nose pliers.

it's a "good enough for me" type of connector Wink


hey! Cool

AND, the same vice as me too!! Cool Very Happy

I also use a pair of flat nose pliers (which I bought for £2 in ALDI). They're not brilliant, but they work Idea The trick is to bend one flap (sorry can't remember the term used) over, then bend the other one round the first one- trying to avoid the 'triangle effect'- if you see what I mean?

The blob of solder is a great tip as well- although careful not to let the heat travel up the metal and melt the trapped wire's sleeve. If that happens, it looks really shitty.

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Luka



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

they are they connectors i use (mostly as they come in the elby-kits)

the metal clips for the wire are pretty fiddly, however i found that if i try attach the cable while the metal clips are still attached in their original formation (ie not break them apart) it is easier to hold them and you lock the wires in with some pliers without needing a clamp to keep it all steady

i usually solder the wire once it is actually already locked into the clip, just to make sure it aint going anywhere

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frijitz



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Rykhaard wrote:

- I strip approximately 1/4" of the 24 guage wire
- I lay the pin with 4 wings on the desk
- I place the stripped wire portion fully between the wings
- Putting the 1/32" soldering iron tip into the space between the wings, heating the pin and wire, I add enough solder to make a full connection

Ummm ... It works better if you strip off less wire and put one pair of "wings" around the stripped end and the other around the insulation. (strain relief)

EDIT: as in Etaoin's pics.
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Rykhaard



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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

frijitz wrote:

Ummm ... It works better if you strip off less wire and put one pair of "wings" around the stripped end and the other around the insulation. (strain relief)

EDIT: as in Etaoin's pics.


In that regard, you DO get more strength on the wire itself at the connection to the pin. The rear wings on my 'fake Molex' pins though, aren't long enough TO go around the 24g insulation. Sad (Mode Electronics copy. Razz )

I'll be looking into ordering authentic Molex pins and harnesses during my next order later this week. Smile I HAVE crimped that way in the past, when I was using real Molex pins. Embarassed

I'm okay with this for the moment as there's very little disconnection / reconnection going on. But still ...... I prefer to have as much strength in things I build, as possible. Smile (Especially with how crappily so much in life around us is built, nowadays. Razz Sad )
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frijitz



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 6:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Rykhaard wrote:
But still ...... I prefer to have as much strength in things I build, as possible.

Maybe you should use a welder, then.

Wires almost always break off because of repeated flexing at the joint, not because of insufficient strength. Try pulling a solder joint apart.
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Rykhaard



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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

frijitz wrote:
Rykhaard wrote:
But still ...... I prefer to have as much strength in things I build, as possible.

Maybe you should use a welder, then.

Wires almost always break off because of repeated flexing at the joint, not because of insufficient strength. Try pulling a solder joint apart.


Ahh. But here, being a power supply connection - the only flexing that occurs is during removal from or returning to, the rack, which is rare as well as any very minor jostling about, with the addition / removal of another panel.

The wire insulation's properties add to the flexibility / durability of the wire. (I.E. Where the wire itself is clamped to something, like the wings of a proper pin connector).

When I come to ordering Molex pins, I'll be sure to order the larger of the 2 types. (Not the 24-28g. But the 18-24, I believe the other were, mentioned above?) It should (logically, I feel) have longer ears for encompassing the greater wire diameters, than the cheap-o's that I currently have.

Oh yeah - forgot that one: very tru! A well soldered joint - chances are greater of breaking the wire, before pulling the actual joint apart. (Unless the joint is on a PCB.) Smile (Known from past experiences.)
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amp1ron



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PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

crashlander42 wrote:

At the surplus store where I got mine they had them in red, white, green, and amber. I found red to be the most aesthetically pleasing. I think they just make them in different colors so the obsessive-compulsive engineering crowd can color code things. Laughing


I believe these are the color code for MTA-100 and MTA-156 connectors:

Red 22 AWG stranded
White 24 AWG stranded
Blue 26 AWG stranded
Green 28 AWG stranded

In the past the connectors were all a solid color. I understand there are some new ones being produced that are natural colored with a stripe (one of the above colors) that indicates the gauge of wire that the connector should be used with. I've not yet seen any of the new connectors with a stripe of color on them.
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