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 Forum index » Clavia Nord Modular » Nord Modular G2 Discussion
Is it easy to switch power supply from 110V to 230V
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Ondrash



Joined: Apr 10, 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:23 am    Post subject: Is it easy to switch power supply from 110V to 230V Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Hello I would like to buy G2X from US. I need to change power supply from 110V to 230V. Is it possible? Is it easy? I can´t get any information in G2 manual.

Many thanks

Ondrash
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Sinuosity



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I have Engine
There is switch inside (230/115)
I think G2x is similar
Sorry my bad English Embarassed
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Wout Blommers



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

And don't forget to change the fuse!

230 V - 100mA slow blow.

Wout
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steve m



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I just changed the voltage on my G2X from 110v to 220v, very easy to do and better than having a step-down transformer.

Having removed the 6 screws along the back and one towards the front of theeach side ( not the two rear sides because they act as hinges ) and also 2 screws on the bottom, th elid hinges up towards the rear.

Indside you will see the PSU board, ( it has a big square blue switch mode module on it ). On that board is a big black switch clearly marked, just flick this to your required voltage.

Don't worry about 110,115,120 or 220,230,240 , so these PSU's can work within 10% of the supply voltage without a problem.

The fuse rating for 100v is 300mA, for 220v it's 150mA. ( for 220v it's OK to leave the 300mA fuse in, at that current it will still adequately protect the PSU circuit.) They are standard 30mm quick blow fuses.


nordpsu.jpg
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You can see the voltage switch here, it's a big black plastic slider switch with the selected voltage printed on it. A bit fuzzy, sorry, but you can see it OK.
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Steve M - Australia

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thesmallisbeautiful



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Sorry to sound like an idiot here, but does this mean that if I bought my G2 in the USA and then moved to Europe (which I did) that I can adjust it simply by flipping the switch, with no need to buy a new fuse?

That is wonderful news!
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Wout Blommers



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

That's what the man wrote....

I'm not sure about the Watts of the fuse, but see also http://electro-music.com/forum/topic-29716.html

Wout
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steve m



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wout Blommers wrote:
That's what the man wrote....

I'm not sure about the Watts of the fuse, but see also http://electro-music.com/forum/topic-29716.html

Wout



First of all please don't confuse voltage( volts ) , current ( amps ) and power ( watts ). It's easy to use the wrong terminology.

In simple terms Power = Volts x Amps. ( for theorists this is not entirely true, but for the purposes of explaining this it's near enough ! )

110v G2 draws max 300mA from the mains and uses max 33watts of power
240v G2 draws max 150mA from the mains and uses max 33 watts of power

Switched over and plugged into a 240v mains supply your imported G2 draws a maximum of 150mA, so there's no need to change the fuse unless you really want to as it already has a 300mA fuse fitted. The fuse in your imported G2 is rated at 300mA so it will not blow unless a fault occurs in the G2 which raises the input current above 300mA, at which point it will blow and turn the power off for you. You could change the fuse for a 150mA fuse or 250mA if you like, that just means that it will blow at 150mA or 250mA instead and switch off just a bit quicker in a fault situation. In power terms though, 300mA is very low. ( mA means milli-amp, 300 mA is 300/1000th's of an amp, or 0.3Amps. )

A G2 switched to and running at 110v mains voltage draws a current of 300mA, which is why it has a 300mA fuse fitted. if it had a 150mA fuse fitted the fuse would keep blowing as the current being drawn by the G2 would be more than the fuse could handle. A fuse is just a simple safetly switch.

If you had a much larger rated fuse installed - 1 Amp fuse for instance, the G2 would work OK but in a fault situation part of the G2's circuit may fail before the fuse did because of the relatively higher current being drawn.

Don't forget a fuse is just a safetly devise comprising a peice of special wire in a glass tube which burns away when too much current passes through it - that's all, nothing fancy. Replacments are available at shops like Tandy for a dollar.

I hope this helps non-technical users to understand how the mains voltage relates to the current rating of a fuse. cheers.

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Steve M - Australia

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Wout Blommers



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

steve m wrote:
...
110v G2 draws max 300mA from the mains and uses max 33 watts of power
240v G2 draws max 150mA from the mains and uses max 33 watts of power
...
Sure 110x0.3 = 220x0.15 = 33 (Watt), but Clavia once published:

Fuse for 115V = 250 mA Slow Blow

Fuse for 230V = 100 mA Slow Blow

(The figures I wrote in the other thread are from a technician...)

What will it be?

Wout
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Wout Blommers



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

To make it more interesting...

Just checked some Clavia synths and the fuses read:

L250/T100mA

I take they mean 250 V 100mA (= 25 Watt ???)
Using 230V means 23 Watt? 10 Watt less?

Wout
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steve m



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wout Blommers wrote:
To make it more interesting...

Just checked some Clavia synths and the fuses read:

L250/T100mA

I take they mean 250 V 100mA (= 25 Watt ???)
Using 230V means 23 Watt? 10 Watt less?

Wout


yes, 250v 100mA is the rating of that fuse, so if the mains supply is 250v and the current being drawn by the equipment is 100mA, ths fuse is operating at it's maximum rating, and the max power which can be drawn through it is 25watts. If the mains supply is 230v, the current being drawn by the equipment to achieve teh same power will be about 10% more so theoritcally the current drawn would be higher and you would need a slightly bigger fuse. At 120v the current would be double, so you would need a much bigger fuse.

However, the fuse reccomended by the manufacturer is typically larger than the actual current being drawn during normal use. Current will peak at switch on, so if they don't do this the fuse would blow prematurely.

So if equipment actually uses 15 Watts at 240v, it would draw 62mA. The designers would specify a fuse of 100mA or 150mA, to give it some headroom.

I am not sure what the actual power used by a G2 is, but if the recommended fuse is 250V 150mA, the fuse can handle a maximum of 37.5 watts under normal max operting conditions. I would guess that the G2 would actually draw about 25 watts, which would allow for peaks above that value.

Slow blow fuses are also sometimes specified to prevent power-on surges taking out a fuse near to it's limit. This is what the 'T' is on your fuse. T = time delay ( slow ) F = fast blow.

Who would have thought that the humble fuse could be so interesting ? Rolling Eyes

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Steve M - Australia

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Wout Blommers



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

steve m wrote:
... Who would have thought that the humble fuse could be so interesting ? Rolling Eyes
That quite easy Smile People don't want to destroy their synth. As the G2 being abandoned the second market will flow, so people will buy from all over the world rather then by their local dealer, so sometimes they have to change the power settings and they don't like that.

Anyway, after a new check up, the before 2000 synths all are 250V 100mA; after 2000 they are 250V 125mA

Is the other power 125V 200mA and 250V 250mA?

Wout
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steve m



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 26, 2008 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wout Blommers wrote:
... Is the other power 125V 200mA and 250V 250mA?


yep, that would work. Half the voltage, double the current! Cool

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Steve M - Australia

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The Enright House



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I bought my G2x in New Zealand and just moved to the States. On the back of my G2x it specifies 230V / 125 mA fuse. Now that I am in the states, can I just switch the powerplug and use it as it is, or do I have to change the fuse and/or flip an internal switch before I do that?
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Blue Hell
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Enright House wrote:
[...]or do I have to change the fuse and/or flip an internal switch before I do that?


Wasn't NZ using 110 / 115 Volts as well thinking

Anyway, I'd open the synth to check if it's set to 220/230 or to 110/115 volts ... for the US it should be set to 110/115, and when it was set that way already you could just use it ... and otherwise you'll have to change it.

When it's been set to 110/115 I'd advise to make a clear mark about this on the back of the synth indicating so ... it's a bit confusing otherwise for a possible unknowing other user ...

Also I'd check the fuse to actually have the value it should i.e. 250 or 300 mA for 110/115 Volt.

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steve m



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

The Enright House wrote:
I bought my G2x in New Zealand and just moved to the States. On the back of my G2x it specifies 230V / 125 mA fuse. Now that I am in the states, can I just switch the powerplug and use it as it is, or do I have to change the fuse and/or flip an internal switch before I do that?


New Zealand power is 240v, just like Australia and UK. So if your synth was setup for 240v you need to change it for 110v as follows:-

Open up the Synth and change the voltage selector switch on the PSU board to 110v. It's a big black switch sat next to the big blue power supply module, you can't miss it. Because the synth will be running at 110v it will use 2 x the current, so check the fuse and if required change it for a 300mA one, other wise it may blow with the extra current. If it's already 300mA then it's OK.

When you come back to NZ, just flick the switch back to 240v. Laughing

It's as easy as that. No need to use 'powerpacks' or transformers.

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Steve M - Australia

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The Enright House



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PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Thanks everyone. Opened up my G2x yesterday and flicked the switch (totally easy - as you all said it would be!). Just have to find a proper fuse now. Radioshack etc doesn't carry slow blow fuses under 500 mA. Will have to look for one tomorrow.
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modulator_esp
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Does anyone know if this also applies to the original Nord Modular (G1)?

edit, found this thread

http://electro-music.com/forum/topic-29716.html

and an answer, which is sort of, but not so easily as there is no switch, just wires to desolder and resolder in different places

I wonder if it would be possible to install a switch?

or maybe I'd be better of just getting a step up transformer if I take my G1 to em2009

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modulator_esp
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

I ended up getting a switch installed inside my G1, so now it works like the G2 Smile
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Wout Blommers



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Did you make it outside, so you can use the NM also as a smoke generator?

Wink

Wout
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modulator_esp
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2009 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote  Mark this post and the followings unread

Wout Blommers wrote:
Did you make it outside, so you can use the NM also as a smoke generator?

Wink

Wout


no, it is safely inside so no accidental changes are possible Smile

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